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Medicine had not advanced far enough to help many disabled infants.  Most abnormal pregnancies underwent spontaneous abortions (miscarriages), or died during or soon after labor. Pregnancy and childbirth belonged in the womenís domain, and the female reproductive system remained a mysterious region to the village doctor.  Neighboring women or a midwife were more likely to assist during delivery.  If a child was born with a defect, the physicianís rudimentary therapies were unlikely to help.  Therefore, physicians only involved themselves in this subject when personally interested.