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This table illustrates the relative increase in T1D risk (i.e., relative to someone with no high risk haplotypes) according on the number of high risk DQA1-DQB1 haplotypes an individual carries.  Caucasians with two high risk haplotypes have a 16-fold higher T1D risk than an individual who has no high risk haplotypes.  And the risk for Caucasian individuals with one high risk haplotype is about 4 times higher that the risk for someone with no high risk haplotypes.  This also means that Caucasians with two high risk haplotypes are 4 times more likely to develop T1D than those with one high risk haplotype. And individuals with one high risk haplotype are about 4 times more likely to develop T1D than those with no high risk haplotypes.
 
As illustrated, the magnitude of the relative increase in risk differs by ethnicity.  However, the same trends are apparent individuals with two high risk haplotypes are most likely to develop T1D.  This likely indicates that the frequency other genes and / or environmental factors that influence T1D risk varies across ethnic groups.  It also indicates that it is important to consider ethnicity when calculating and interpreting genetic test results.