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Click below to learn more about the Nationality Rooms scholarship program, to get application forms, and to become more acquainted with the Nationality Rooms Program in general:

 

Scholarships

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About the Committee

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Scholarships

 

 

 

African Heritage Classroom

 

Summer Scholarships

 

The African Heritage Classroom opened in 1989. Since that time the main function of the Room Committee has been to raise funds to help graduate students from the University of Pittsburgh travel to Africa for study and/or research.  These awards typically are worth $2,500 and are given in conjunction with the Nationality Room’s goal of sponsoring understanding of other countries and cultures.

 

Previous winners of African Heritage scholarships, and the countries they visited:

 

 

Student

Year

Country

Patricia Saunders

1991

Ghana

Kimberly Brown

1992

Zimbabwe

Heidi Streetman

1993

Kenya

Chishamiso Rowley

1994

Nigeria

Cathleen Laporte

1995

Zimbabwe

Kevin Morse

1996

S. Africa

Sera Keriuki

1997

Kenya

Andrea Rogers

1998

S. Africa

Dondi Ojeda

1999

Ghana

Jenny Walker

2000

Mali

Ashley Currier

Zimbabwe

Christophas Walker

S. Africa

Shayna Murdock

2001

Ghana

Alvin Jones

2002

Tanzania

Michael Doe

Ghana

Linda Hunt

2003

Senegal, Ghana, The Gambia

Yemsrach Dessalegn

2004

Ethiopia

Anne Nagy

 

Kenya

Christopher Sang

2005

The Gambia, Senegal

Tahir Abdullah

2006

The Gambia, Senegal

Adam Iddriss

 

Tanzania

Raynard Washington

 

Tanzania

Monique Thomas

 

The Gambia, Senegal

Suzanne Adjogah

2007

Morocco

Penelope Nelson-Bisset

 

Ghana

Zimife Umeh

2008

South Africa

Eliade Nwosu

 

South Africa

 

 

 

Note:  Since 2000, the Committee’s award has sometimes included $1,000 from the Walter C. Worthington Foundation

 

Testimony of Scholarship winner

ALVIN JONES, in Tanzania:

“I woke up at 7 a.m., got dressed and had tea and breakfast with my home stay father. Then I would usually walk into town instead of taking the local transport, called the dalladalla. I liked to walk instead of taking the dalladalla because they would really cram them full of people and it was very uncomfortable. The walk to the day camp where I worked was about 45 minutes. The camp would start at 9 a.m. and we would do icebreakers, educational lectures, have lunch, and sports. Then camp would end at 3 p.m. and I would go hang out around town with a few local vendors. Sometimes we would discuss how HIV affected their communities, sometimes they would help me with my Swahili, and sometimes we would just chill. Then I would be on my way home around 6 p.m. because it wasn't safe for a foreigner like me to be walking around after dark. Then at home I would sit on the couch and watch TV with my father. There was only one channel so there was no need for channel surfing. At about 8 p.m. every night my mom would welcome me to dinner. As the guest in their house they would always wait for me to choose my food first before they did and they would really try to stuff and satisfy me. After dinner I'd watch some more TV and then go to sleep at about 9:30 p.m.”