Name: Matthew Fisher
Title: Graduate Student






Educational Background: BS, Columbia University, May 2005

 

MSRC Research Group: Tissue Mechanics, Knee Kinematics & Robotics

 

Lab Contact Info:

Musculoskeletal Research Center

405 Center for Bioengineering
300 Technology Drive
Pittsburgh, PA 15219

Phone: 412-648-1943
Fax: 412-648-2001
mbf7@pitt.edu

 

Research Interests:

  • Ligament and tendon mechanics
  • Patellar tendon healing
  • Functional tissue engineering using small intestine submucosa (SIS) bioscaffolds
  • Joint biomechanics
  • Robotics technology

 

Current Projects:

Using SIS bioscaffolds to improve ACL healing

The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is the most frequently injured knee ligament during sports and work related activities, with tears occurring in 100,000 to 150,000 people in the United States each year.  Since ACL ruptures do not heal, surgical reconstructions using tissue grafts are the common alternative to restore knee function.  However, around 20-25% of patients have less than satisfactory outcomes in the long-term. 

This has renewed interests in healing of the ACL.  Our research center has utilized extracellular matrix (ECM) bioscaffolds, in particular the small intestinal submucosa (SIS), to improve healing of ligaments and tendons.  In this study, our objective was to assess the feasibility of SIS treatment on ACL healing using the goat model.  We hypothesized that the chemoattractants in the SIS hydrogel can accelerate the formation of healing tissue, while a layer of SIS wrapping around the injury site can guide neo-tissue formation with limited hypertrophy.  Ultimately, the recovery of the biomechanical properties of the healing ACL would positively contribute to knee stability. 

            At 12 weeks, the SIS-treated group had reduced knee instability by 30-60% compared to ACL-deficient knees.  The values for in-situ force in the healing ACL were 98% and 93% of those for the sham-operated ACLs at 30° and 60° of flexion.  Gross morphology of the healing ACL in the SIS-treated group showed continuous tissue formation, and its cross-sectional area was similar to the sham-operated ACL.  Additionally, histological observation of the healing ACL revealed aligned collagen fibers and spindle-shaped cells.  Finally, the FATCs from the SIS-treated group had stiffness values reaching 42% of those for the sham-operated controls. These positive findings of the healing ACL after the application of αGal(-) SIS bioscaffolds in combination with αGal(-) SIS hydrogel following primary repair are encouraging.  In particular, the new approach could accelerate the healing of a transected ACL with limited tissue hypertrophy. 

 

All-Inside ACL Reconstruction

            The Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) is a main stabilizer in the human knee joint.  The incidence of ACL injury in the United States alone, is estimated to be 1 in 3000 individuals per year and surgical reconstruction is usually required in over 100,000 patients to restore normal knee function and stability.  When performing an ACL reconstruction many factors should be taken into account to restore the anatomy and biomechanics of the normal ACL. The traditional single bundle ACL reconstruction involves harvesting the middle third of patellar tendon or the semitendinosis and gracilis hamstring tendons.  ACL reconstruction using hamstring tendons has recently received attention because it offers advantages of less donor site morbidity compared to the patellar tendon, less anterior knee pain and earlier rehabilitation. Of course there are some concerns in using the hamstring grafts such as loss of active knee flexion at deeper flexion angles as well as muscular weakness and its effects on knee function and stability.

Recently, an All-inside technique for single bundle ACL reconstruction has been developed by Prof. Giuliano Cerulli from the University of Perugia-Italy to eliminate the need to harvest both hamstrings tendons. In this technique, the femoral and tibial tunnels are drilled halfway through the bone manually with a special drill. The decreased length of the bone tunnels the length allows the use of only one hamstring tendon (gracilis or semitendinosus). Additionally advantages include no burning of the tunnel common with electrically powered drills, the ability to adjust the tunnel length. good fixation in the half-tunnel, easier graft attachment, limited esthetical damage, lower infection risk and less bleeding. At a medium follow-up, excellent clinical results have been experienced with a good patients satisfaction, a rapid return to previous activity, satisfactory stability and good muscle function. However, it is necessary to validate the effectiveness this technique in terms of restoring knee function on controlled laboratory study and to compare with historical single bundle hamstring reconstruction data in the literature. Further it is unclear if the semitendinosus and gracilis are equally effective using the All-inside technique, as there maybe differences in their biomechanical properties.

            Thus, in this project, in collaboration with Let People Move in Perugia-Italy and Innovazione Medica, we wish to validate the All-Inside technique using our robotic/UFS testing System and determine if ACL reconstruction with the All-Inside technique using one hamstring tendon restore normal knee kinematics and in-situ force in the graft.

 

  

Publications: 

1.      Karaoglu S., Fisher M.B., Woo S.L-Y., Fu Y.C., Liang R., Abramowitch S.D.. Use of a bioscaffold to improve healing of the patellar tendon defect after graft harvest for ACL reconstruction: A study in rabbits. Journal of Orthopaedic Research, 26(2): 255-263, 2008.

2.      Woo S.L-Y., Fisher M.B., Feola, A.J.  Contribution of Biomechanics to Management of Ligament and Tendon Injuries.  Molecular and Cellular Biomechanics, 5(1): 49-68, 2008.

3.      Kelly, T. N., Fisher, M.B., Oswald, E.S., Tai, T., Mauck, R.L., Ateshian, G.A., and Hung, C.T. Low-Serum Media and Dynamic Deformational Loading in Tissue Engineering of Articular Cartilage. Annals of Biomedical Engineering, 36(5): 769-779, 2008.

4.      Woo S.L-Y. and Fisher M.B.  Evaluation of Knee Stability Using a Robotic System.  Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, 91(Supp. 1): 78-84, 2009.

5.      Jung, H-J., Woo S.L-Y., and Fisher M.B. Role of Biomechanics in the Understanding of Normal, Injured, and Healing Ligaments and Tendons.  Sports Medicine, Arthroscopy, Rehabilitation, Therapy & Technology, 1(9), 2009.

6.      Woo S.L-Y., Liang, R., and Fisher M.B.  Future of Orthopaedic Sports Medicine and Soft Tissue Healing: the Important Role of Engineering.  Cellular and Molecular Bioengineering, 2(3): 448-461, 2009.

7.      Zamarra, G. Fisher, M.B., Cerulli G., and Woo, S.L-Y. Biomechanical Evaluation Using One Hamstrings Tendon for ACL Reconstruction: A Human Cadaveric Study. Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy, 18: 11-19, 2010.

 

Published Book Chapters:  

1.      Woo, S.L-Y., Jung, H-J., and Fisher, M.B. Functional Tissues Engineering of Ligament and Tendon Injuries. In Translational Approaches in Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine.  Ed. J. Mao, G. Vunjak-Novakovic, A. Mikos, A. Atala. Artech House.  Published 11/30/2007.

2.      Woo, S.L-Y., Almarza, A.J., Liang, R., and Fisher, M.B. Biomechanical Variation of Double Bundle Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction. In Sports Injuries- Current Trends and Concepts.  Ed. N. Doral. To be Published in June, 2010.

3.      Woo, S.L-Y., Almarza, A.J., Karaoglu, S., Liang, R., and Fisher, M.B. Functional Tissues Engineering of Ligament and Tendon Injuries. Principles of Regenerative Medicine, 2nd edition. Ed. A. Atala. To be Published in 2010.

 

Recent Abstracts (2008-present):

1.  Woo, S.L-Y., Almarza, A.J., Fisher, M.B., Liang, R.  Biologic Effects of ECM Bioscaffolds for Ligament and Tendon Healing and Regeneration.  5th Symposium on the use of extracellular matrix as a biological scaffold for tissue reconstruction.  Scottsdale, Arizona. February 2008.

2.   Woo, S.L-Y., Fisher, M.B., Liang, R.  Biomechanical and Functional Assessment of ACL Reconstruction.  International Symposium on Ligaments and Tendons – Hong Kong.  Hong Kong, China. April 2008.

3.    Woo S.L-Y. and Fisher, M.B. Evaluation of Knee Stability using a Robotic Testing System. AAOS/ORS Advanced Imaging and Computer Assisted Surgery of the Hip and Knee Research.  Providence, RI. May 2008.

4.     Debski, R.E., Fisher, M.B., Jolly, J.T., Woo, S.L-Y. Use of Robotic Technology at the Muscoluskeletal Research Center: Technical Challenges. International Symposium on Robotic Applications in Biomechanics. Banff, Canada. May 2008.

5.      Zamarra, G., Fisher, M.B., Cerulli, G., Woo, S.L-Y. Utilization of Only One Hamstrings Tendon for ACL Reconstruction: An “All-Inside” Technique. 16th International Conference on Mechanics in Medicine and Biology. Pittsburgh, PA. July 2008.

6.      Woo, S.L-Y., Fisher, M.B., Almarza, A.J.  Regeneration of Ligaments and Tendons by Application of Bioscaffolds.  ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress & Exposition.  Boston, MA. October 2008.

7.      Woo, S.L-Y., Liang, R., Fisher, M.B. Biomedical Engineering and its Important Role to the Healing, Repair, and Regeneration of Ligaments and Tendons.  10th Shanghai Round Table on Biomedical Engineering.  November 2008.

8.      Zamarra G., Fisher, M.B., Woo, S. L-Y., Cerulli, G. Utilization of Only One Hamstrings Tendon for ACL. 5th Meeting of the European Federation of National Associates of Orthopaedic Sports Traumatology. November 2008.

9.      Fisher, M.B., Jung, H., McMahon, P.J., Woo, S. L-Y. In-vitro Evaluation of Suture Augmentation Techniques After ACL Injury. International Symposium on Ligaments and Tendons IX. Las Vegas, NV, February, 2009.

10.  Fisher, M.B., Zamarra, G., Cirillo, A., Liang, R., Almarza, A.J., McMahon, P.J., Woo, S.L-Y. Improved Healing of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament Following Genetically-Engineered Bioscaffold Treatment in the Goat Model. 55th Annual Meeting of the Orthopaedic Research Society. Las Vegas, NV, February 2009.

11.  Liang, R., Ferderber, M., Fisher, M.B., Woo, S. L-Y. The Expressions of Fibronectin and TGF-beta in the Gal Knockout ECM Bioscaffold. 55th Annual Meeting of the Orthopaedic Research Society. Las Vegas, NV, February 2009.

12.  Fisher, M.B. and Woo, S.L-Y. Mechanical Properties of Extracellular Matrix Bioscaffolds Derived from Genetically-Modified Pigs. 2009 Midwestern Tissue Engineering Consortium. Pittsburgh, PA, April 2009.

13.  Liang, R., Fisher, M.B., Yang, G., and Woo, S.L-Y. Expression of Fibronectin and TGF-beta in UBM Derived from Genetically-Modified Pigs. 2009 Midwestern Tissue Engineering Consortium. Pittsburgh, PA,  April 2009.

14.  Liang, R., Fisher, M.B., and Woo, S.L-Y. ECM Bioscaffold Improves Healing of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament in Goat. 2009 Midwestern Tissue Engineering Consortium. Pittsburgh, PA, April 2009.

15.  Fisher, M.B., Jung, H., McMahon, P.J., and Woo, S. L-Y. Effects of Tunnel Location for Suture Augmentation Following Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury. ASME Summer Bioengineering Conference. Lake Tahoe, CA, June 2009.

16.  Fisher, M.B., Liang, R., Jung, H., McMahon, P.J., and Woo S.L-Y. Use of a Novel Extracellular Matrix Bioscaffold to Enhance Anterior Cruciate Ligament Healing. Biomedical Engineering Society Annual Meeting. Pittsburgh, PA, October 2009.

17.  Fisher, M.B. and Woo S.L-Y. Mechanical Properties of Extracellular Matrix Bioscaffolds Derived from Genetically-Modified Pigs. Biomedical Engineering Society Annual Meeting. Pittsburgh, PA, October 2009.

18.  Jung H-J., Vangipuram G., Fisher M.B., Yang G., Hsu S., and Woo S.L-Y. Will Multiple Freeze/Thaw Cycles Change the Tensile Properties of Human Patellar Tendons? International Symposium on Ligaments and Tendons X. Hong Kong, China, February, 2010.

19.  Fisher M.B., Liang R., Jung H-J., McMahon, P.J., and Woo S.L-Y. A Novel Extracellular Matrix Bioscaffold Can Enhance ACL Healing. International Symposium on Ligaments and Tendons X. Hong Kong, China, February, 2010.

 

Presentations:  

1.      Fisher, M.B., Abramowitch, S.D., Woo, S. L-Y.  The Effect of Assuming a Negligible Preload on the Viscoelastic Properties of the Normal and Healing Rabbit Patellar Tendon.  American Society of Mechanical Engineers Summer Bioengineering Conference.  Amelia Island, Florida. June 2006.

2.      Debski, R.E., Fisher, M.B., Jolly, J.T., Woo, S.L-Y. Use of Robotic Technology at the Muscoluskeletal Research Center: Technical Challenges. International Symposium on Robotic Applications in Biomechanics. Banff, Canada. May 2008.

3.      Zamarra, G., Fisher, M.B., Cerulli, G., Woo, S.L-Y. Utilization of Only One Hamstrings Tendon for ACL Reconstruction: An “All-Inside” Technique. 16th International Conference on Mechanics in Medicine and Biology. Pittsburgh, PA. July 2008.

4.      Woo, S.L-Y., Fisher, M.B., Almarza, A.J.  Regeneration of Ligaments and Tendons by Application of Bioscaffolds.  ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress & Exposition.  Boston, MA. October 2008.

5.      Fisher, M.B., Jung, H., McMahon, P.J., Woo, S. L-Y. In-vitro Evaluation of Suture Augmentation Techniques After ACL Injury. International Symposium on Ligaments and Tendons IX. Las Vegas, NV, February, 2009.

6.      Fisher, M.B., Zamarra, G., Cirillo, A., Liang, R., McMahon, P.J., Woo, S.L-Y. Improved Healing of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament Following Genetically-Engineered Bioscaffold Treatment in the Goat Model. 55th Annual Meeting of the Orthopaedic Research Society. Las Vegas, NV, February 2009.

7.      Fisher, M.B. and Woo, S.L-Y. Mechanical Properties of Extracellular Matrix Bioscaffolds Derived from Genetically-Modified Pigs. 2009 Midwestern Tissue Engineering Consortium. Pittsburgh, PA, April 2009.

8.      Fisher, M.B., Jung, H., McMahon, P.J., Woo, S. L-Y. Effects of Tunnel Location for Suture Augmentation Following Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury. ASME Summer Bioengineering Conference. Lake Tahoe, CA, June, 2009.

9.      Fisher, M.B., Zamarra, G., Jung, H., Liang, R., Almarza, A., McMahon, P.J., Woo, S. L-Y. Extracellular Matrix Bioscaffolds to Enhance Anterior Cruciate Ligament Healing.  Graduate Student Summer Colloquium, Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh. Pittsburgh, PA, August, 2009.

10.  Fisher M.B., Jung H-J., Yang, G., Bianchi, J., Ronholdt C., Woo S.L-Y. Impact of Multiple Freeze-Thaw Cycles on the Biomechanical Properties of the Human Patellar Tendon. 33rd Annual Meeting of the American Association of Tissue Banks. Las Vegas, NV, September, 2009.

11.  Fisher, M.B., Liang, R., Jung, H., McMahon, P.J., and Woo S.L-Y. Use of a Novel Extracellular Matrix Bioscaffold to Enhance Anterior Cruciate Ligament Healing. Biomedical Engineering Society Annual Meeting. Pittsburgh, PA, October 2009.

12.  Fisher M.B., Liang R., Jung H-J., McMahon, P.J., and Woo S.L-Y. A Novel Extracellular Matrix Bioscaffold Can Enhance ACL Healing. International Symposium on Ligaments and Tendons X. Hong Kong, China, February, 2010.

 

Awards:

2009               Best Student Presentation, International Symposium on Ligaments and

                       Tendons IX

2008               Outstanding Graduate Student Award, Musculoskeletal Research

                       Center

2007               Outstanding Graduate Student Award, Musculoskeletal Research

                       Center

2007               Outstanding Research Assistant, Department of Bioengineering

2005-2008      Biomechanics in Regenerative Medicine T-32 Fellowship

2005              Annual Symposium Award, Summer Internship Research Program, Musculoskeletal Research Center

2005               Graduated Cum Laude

2004-2005      Frieda Dicker Scholarship from the Dept. of Biomedical Engineering

2001-2005      Dean’s List

 

Hobbies: Tennis, Golf, watching the Pirates and Steelers

 

Home Country: USA