Post doctoral research associate

Eng.D The University of Strathclyde (2010)

Office: 305A Langley Hall
Telephone:412-624-7332
Fax:412-624-9198
E-mail: sge3@pitt.edu
Website:



Research Summary:

My principle research interests lie in the field of deep brain stimulation (DBS) and its potential role in the treatment of psychiatric disease. Currently I am investigating the effects of high frequency stimulation of the nucleus accumbens on network oscillatory activity.

My future research plans are to (a) further explore the therapeutic potential for DBS in disease states associated with aberrant frontal cortex function (particularly OCD and schizophrenia) and by doing so to (b) elucidate the mechanism(s) of action by which DBS affects its therapeutic benefit.    


Conference Abstracts:

Ewing, S, & Grace, A. 2010. High frequency unilateral deep brain stimulation of the nucleus accumbens induces alterations in local field potential oscillations in regions both ipsilateral and contralateral to stimulation in awake, freely moving animals. 2010 Neuroscience Meeting Planner, Program No. 162.13, San Diego: Society for Neuroscience, 2010. Online.

Ewing, S, & Pratt, J. 2010. Deep brain stimulation of the mediodorsal thalamic nucleus and its implications for the treatment of schizophrenia. J. Schres. Abstr., 117, 277–278.

Ewing, S, Waddell, C, Porr, B, & Pratt, J. 2008. Combating Cortical Hypofontality. Deep brain stimulation of the corticolimbothalamic loop: implications for the treatment of schizophrenia. 2008 Neuroscience Meeting Planner, Program No. 101.20, Washington, DC: Society for Neuroscience, 2008. Online.

Ewing, S, Porr, B, & Pratt, J. 2009. Combating Cortical Hypofontality. Deep brain stimulation of the mediodorsal thalamic nucleus: implications for the treatment of schizophrenia. British Neurosci. Assoc. Abstr., 20, P61.10.


Links:

cv.pdf