Nineteenth-Century "Pre-Raphaelite" Art Based on British Literary Subjects: A Selection

1. William Holman Hunt, "The Eve of St. Agnes" 1848.

2. Daniel Maclise, "Madeline After Prayer" 1868.

3. Sir John Everett Millais, "Ophelia" 1852.

4. Sir John Everett Millais, "Mariana" 1851.

5. John William Waterhouse, "The Lady of Shalott" 1888.

6. William Holman Hunt, "The Lady of Shalott" 1905.


1. William Holman Hunt, "The Eve of St. Agnes," 1848. See closing stanzas of John Keats's "The Eve of St. Agnes," stanzas XLI-XLII. "They glide, like phantoms, into the wide hall; / Like phantoms to the iron porch they glide; / Where lay the Porter, in uneasy sprawl, / With a huge empty flagon by his side"


2. Daniel Maclise, Madeline After Prayer, 1868. See Keats's "The Eve of St. Agnes," stanzas XXIV-XXV: the stained glass window in Madeline's bedroom.


3. Sir John Everett Millais, Ophelia. 1852 at Royal Academy Exhibition. Depicts Ophelia's suicide from Shakespeare's tragedy, Hamlet. Model: Elizabeth Siddall had to lie in a bathtub full of water for hours while Millais painstakingly worked on capturing the effect of her floating dress.


4. Sir John Everett Millais, Mariana. 1851. Based on Tennyson’s poem, "Mariana." 


5. John William Waterhouse, "The Lady of Shalott" 1888. See Part 4 of Tennyson's poem.


6. William Holman Hunt, "The Lady of Shalott." Hunt's last major work--exhibited 1905. See Tennyson's poem, Part 3, lines 109-117: "She left the web, she left the loom, / She made three paces through the room, / She saw the water-lily bloom, / She saw the helmet and the plume, / She look'd down to Camelot. / Out flew the web and floated wide; / The mirror crack'd from side to side; / 'The curse is come upon me,' cried / The Lady of Shalott."


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