Undergraduate Bioengineering Program Handbook

University of Pittsburgh

 

Contents:

 

1. Undergraduate Program Description

2. Bioengineering Tracks

3. Undergraduate Bioengineering Course Descriptions

4. Minors and Certificates

5. Academic Regulations, Procedures, and Guidelines

6. Post-Graduation Planning

 

1. Undergraduate Program Description

 

1.1. Undergraduate Program Rationale

In keeping with the two-fold mission of the Department of Bioengineering to: provide a high-quality engineering education to both undergraduate and graduate students, and be a leader in research in specific areas encompassed by Bioengineering, the Bioengineering undergraduate curriculum has the objective to prepare students to achieve their post-baccalaureate goal of (a) an industrial career in bioengineering or related field; (b) graduate school (M.S. and Ph.D. programs related to bioengineering); or (c) professional school (Medical, Dental, Health-Related, Business, and Law).

 

To achieve their particular goal(s), students are: (a) provided with a broad knowledge of the technical and social principles of bioengineering as well as a focused education in one track area within bioengineering; and (b) prepared through educational experiences beyond the classroom that deepen their understanding of the technical and non-technical issues in bioengineering process and design.

 

1.2. Bioengineering Undergraduate Curriculum

The Bioengineering undergraduate curriculum has seven pedagogical components (see Figures 1, reflecting course titles, and 2, reflecting course numbers) with options for dual degrees, minors, and certificates.

 

 

Figure 1. Bioengineering Undergraduate Program curriculum (reflecting course titles) at a glance. Click on image to view a larger version.

 

 

Figure 2. Bioengineering Undergraduate Program curriculum (reflecting pertinent course numbers) at a glance. Click on image to view a larger version.

 

Refer to the Undergraduate Bioengineering Student Resources or Appendix A to see one possible, 4-year, semester-by-semester sequence through the curriculum, both for non-pre-med and pre-med paths. Bioengineering students can monitor their own progression through the curriculum using the Degree Progress Worksheet (DPW; found under Undergraduate Bioengineering Forms).

 

Dual Degrees, Minors, and Certificates: We encourage our students to take full advantage of University of Pittsburgh resources and educational opportunities. Many of our students seek a Dual Degree that augments the bioengineering experience – sometimes another engineering degree, sometimes a degree in Arts & Sciences. Almost all obtain Minors and Certificates that add value to their education and distinguish them as they move forward in their careers. Planning for minors and certificates is a part of developing the Comprehensive Electives Plan (CEP; found under Undergraduate Bioengineering Forms) and needs to start as early as the sophomore year; perhaps, even, the freshman year!

 

1.2.1. Required Mathematics Courses (6 Courses)

We require that students master basic mathematical skills in analytical geometry, calculus, linear algebra, differential equations, and statistics as preparation for mastery of bioengineering applications. The basic math courses include:

·      MATH 0220 (4 credits): Analytical Geometry and Calculus 1

·      MATH 0230 (4 credits): Analytical Geometry and Calculus 2

·      MATH 0240 (4 credits): Analytical Geometry and Calculus 3

·      Differential Equations (3 credits). Either:

o   MATH 0290: Differential Equations, or

o   MATH 1270: Ordinary Differential Equations 1

·      Linear Algebra (3 credits). Either:

o   MATH 0280: Introduction to Matrices & Linear Algebra, or

o   MATH 1180: Linear Algebra 1, or

o   MATH 1185: Honors Linear Algebra

·      BIOENG 1000 (4 credits): Statistics for Bioengineering

 

Students interested in a MATH Minor should consider taking MATH 1270 instead of MATH 0290 and either MATH 1180 or MATH 1185 instead of MATH 0280. See Minors and Certificates for more information.

 

1.2.2. Required Basic Sciences (7 Courses, 1 Lab)

Engineering practice is frequently described as applied science. In addition to knowledge of and ability to use basic physics and chemistry, bioengineers need to be conversant with and able to use concepts of biology and physiology. Because of the importance of cellular processes in bioengineering applications, we have developed our own (required) 2-course sequence in cell and molecular biology.


Note: We do not accept general biology (BIOSC 0150 and BIOSC 0160) as meeting the cell biology requirement or as advanced engineering/science/technical electives.

 

·      Two semesters of calculus-based physics

o   First semester:

§  PHYS 0174 (4 credits): Basic Physics for Science and Engineering 1, or

§  PHYS 0475 (4 credits): Honors Physics 1

o   Second semester:

§  PHYS 0175 (4 credits): Basic Physics for Science and Engineering 2, or

§  PHYS 0476 (4 credits): Honors Physics 2

·      Two semesters of introductory chemistry

o   First semester:

§  CHEM 0110 (4 credits): General Chemistry 1, or

§  CHEM 0410 (3 credits): General Chemistry 1, or

§  CHEM 0710 (4 credits): Honors General Chemistry 1, or

§  CHEM 0760 (3 credits): Honors General Chemistry for Engineers 1, or

§  CHEM 0960 (3 credits): General Chemistry for Engineers 1

o   Second semester:

§  CHEM 0120 (4 credits): General Chemistry 2, or

§  CHEM 0420 (3 credits): General Chemistry 2, or

§  CHEM 0720 (4 credits): Honors General Chemistry 2, or

§  CHEM 0770 (3 credits): Honors General Chemistry for Engineers 2, or

§  CHEM 0970 (3 credits): General Chemistry for Engineers 2

Note: CHEM 0410/CHEM 0420 sequence also requires CHEM 0430 (1 credit): General Chemistry 1 Laboratory.

·      Two semesters of cell and molecular biology

o   First semester:

§  BIOENG 1070 (3 credits): Introductory Cell Biology 1

o   Second semester:

§  BIOENG 1071 (3 credits): Introductory Cell Biology 2, or

§  BIOENG 1072 (3 credits): Honors Introductory Cell Biology 2

·      Biology laboratory

o   BIOSC 0050 (1 credit): Foundations of Biology Laboratory 1 (last offered Summer 2019; please see BIOSC 0057 instead), or

o   BIOSC 0057 (1 credit): Foundations of Biology Research Laboratory 1, or

o   BIOSC 0058 (1 credit): Foundations of Biology SEA-PHAGES Laboratory 1, or

o   BIOSC 0060 (1 credit): Foundations of Biology Laboratory 2 (last offered Summer 2017; see BIOSC 0067 instead), or

o   BIOSC 0067 (1 credit): Foundations of Biology Research Laboratory 2

o   BIOSC 0068 (1 credit): Foundations of Biology SEA-PHAGES Laboratory 2

Note: We accept Advanced Placement (AP) or International Baccalaureate (IB) credits for BIOSC 0050 and BIOSC 0060. See Advanced Standing for more information.

Note: BIOSC 0058/BIOSC 0068 is a specialized two term sequence, in which students isolate and characterize a phage in BIOSC 0058 and continue to use this phage in BIOSC 0068 to perform additional experiments. The Department of Biological Sciences hopes that students in BIOSC 0058 will continue on to BIOSC 0068, although there is no mandatory participation in the latter course. As such, it is recommended that you take BIOSC 0057 or BIOSC 0067 if you are only considering 1 credit of biology laboratory experience.

·      Human Physiology

o   BIOSC 1250 (3 credits): Human Physiology, or

o   NROSCI 1250 (3 credits): Human Physiology, or

o   BIOSC 1070 (4 credits): Honors Human Physiology, or

o   NROSCI 1070 (4 credits): Honors Human Physiology

Note: The 2-semester sequence NUR 0012 (3 credits): Human Anatomy and Physiology 1/NUR 0002 (1 credit): Nursing Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory 1 and NUR 0013 (3 credits): Human Anatomy and Physiology 2/NUR 0003 (1 credit): Nursing Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory 2 can be used to satisfy the Human Physiology requirement plus an advanced engineering/science/technical elective – but both semesters are required to satisfy the Human Physiology requirement.

Note: BIOSC 1080 (6 credits – offered Summer semester only) can be used to satisfy the Human Physiology requirement plus an advanced engineering/science/technical elective.

Current PHYS, CHEM, BIOSC and NROSCI course descriptions can be found at PeopleSoft Mobile.

 

1.2.3. Required Humanities and Social Sciences (6 Courses)

The Swanson School of Engineering (SSoE) requires all undergraduates to complete at least six humanities and social science (HUM/SS) elective courses that adhere to the SSoE Guidelines and Requirements in order to satisfy SSoE and ABET accreditation requirements for breadth and depth. Complete rules for breadth and depth can be found at the Approved Electives webpage.

 

While only approved humanities and social science courses can be used to satisfy the HUM/SS requirements for the Bioengineering degree, the approved list is not static. New courses are added frequently. If you wish to take a course not on the approved list, you need to make a request to the Undergraduate Coordinator before taking the course. Please fill out the HUM/SS Approval Request Form (found under Undergraduate Bioengineering Forms) and e-mail it to the Undergraduate Coordinator, who will seek approval from Engineering Administration and let you know whether the course has been approved. Please do not request a class from a department which is not on the approved list (e.g., Administration of Justice, Business, etc.).


The Department of Bioengineering feels that ethics is such an integral part of societal practice of bioengineering that we have developed our own bioethics course: BIOENG 1241 (3 credits): Social, Political, and Ethical Issues in Bioengineering, that emphasizes the fact that we practice bioengineering in the real world and that we need to be aware of the broad societal impact of doing so. BIOENG 1241 is a required course for all bioengineering undergraduate students. Because of the strong humanities and social science basis, BIOENG 1241 is acceptable as one of the required six HUM/SS electives. Thus, bioengineering undergraduates need at least five additional HUM/SS elective courses drawn from the School’s list of approved courses.

 

The SSoE breadth and depth rules for HUM/SS electives, for the purposes of the Bioengineering program, are interpreted as: students must have at least two courses from the same department to satisfy the depth requirement (students may also satisfy the depth requirement by completing two or more courses with a related theme – in this case, students must submit their intended courses to the Undergraduate Coordinator for approval); and, students must have courses from at least three different departments (in addition to BIOENG 1241) to satisfy the breadth requirement.

 

The University Course Descriptions website has current information about HUM/SS course offerings. Please note that Dietrich School of Arts & Sciences (DSAS) courses cross-listed with College of General Studies (CGS) that are designated as self-paced (self), online (www), or hybrid online (hybrid) are not acceptable for fulfilling the humanities/social science requirement.

 

Note: Students may use an ENGR study abroad experience, such as the Plus3 program, either as an advanced engineering/science/technical elective or as a HUM/SS elective. If students are planning on using an ENGR study abroad experience as a HUM/SS elective, they must inform the Undergraduate Coordinator before partaking in the course.

 

W Requirement: All students must have a Writing course, designated as such in their academic record, in order to satisfy graduation requirements. The W can be satisfied by a course in any department. However, most students choose to take a 3-credit course in the humanities/social sciences. A one-credit W addition to a 3-credit course is also acceptable. A 2-credit W course satisfies the W requirement but cannot be used to satisfy a course requirement. Listings of W courses can be found at the University Course Descriptions website.

 

Students should refer to Peoplesoft (in the Class Search screen, choose Writing Option from the Requirement Designation field) each term to determine whether a course is being offered as a W-designated course (i.e., courses with the Writing Requirement Course attribute). Note that there are courses that may have a writing option but not for all their offered sections. Make sure that you check all sections of a course to enroll in the one that does have the Writing Requirement Course attribute.


Note: ENGCMP 0400 (3 credits): Written Professional Communication or ENGCMP 0401 (3 credits): Written Professional Communication: Topics in Diversity satisfies the W requirement but neither is an acceptable HUM/SS elective.

 

1.2.4. Required Basic Engineering (3 Courses)

The basic engineering courses include:

·      Freshman Engineering, first semester:

o   ENGR 0011 (3 credits): Introduction to Engineering Analysis, or

o   ENGR 0015 (3 credits): Introduction to Engineering Analysis, or

o   ENGR 0711 (3 credits): Honors Engineering Analysis and Computing

Note: Transfer students can substitute any engineering course for the ENGR 0011/ENGR 0015/ENGR 0711 requirement.

·      Freshman Engineering, second semester:

o   ENGR 0012 (3 credits): Introduction to Engineering Computing, or

o   ENGR 0016 (3 credits): Introduction to Engineering Computing, or

o   ENGR 0712 (3 credits): Advanced Engineering Applications for Freshman (Honors)

o   ENGR 0716 (3 credits): Art of Hands-On System Design and Engineering (Art of Making)

Note: Students who take ENGR 0016 must also take ENGCMP 0200 (3 credits): Seminar in Composition.

·      ENGR 0135 (3 credits): Statics and Mechanics of Materials 1

 

The common Freshman courses, ENGR 0011/ENGR 0015/ENGR 0711 and ENGR 0012/ENGR 0016/ENGR 0712/ENGR 0716 are integrated with the Freshman math, physics, and chemistry courses with the specific goals of: (1) introducing students to fundamentals of engineering common to all engineering disciplines, (2) providing an overview of how engineers integrate math, physics, chemistry, and communications into solving practical problems of interest to society, and (3) providing a rigorous foundation in design of computer programs to solve engineering problems.


ENGR 0135 is a basic course in statics and mechanics of materials that applies concepts from physics in understanding the effect of external forces acting on particles and deformable bodies with emphasis on how material responses to external forces impact engineering choices of appropriate materials to use to meet design specifications.

 

1.2.5. Required Core Bioengineering (11 Courses, 6 Seminars)

In keeping with the Department of Bioengineering philosophy that bioengineers draw from all engineering disciplines in the practice of bioengineering and that, therefore, bioengineers should be conversant with and able to employ the basic skills of the various engineering disciplines, the Bioengineering Core consists of:

·      BIOENG 1210 (3 credits): Biothermodynamics or BIOENG 1211 (3 credits): Honors Biothermodynamics

·      BIOENG 1220 (3 credits): Biotransport Phenomena

·      BIOENG 1310 (3 credits): Bioinstrumentation

·      BIOENG 1320 (3 credits): Biosignals and Systems

·      Choice of a Biosignals application course selected from:

o   BIOENG 1255 (4 credits): Dynamic Systems: A Physiological Perspective

o   BIOENG 1580 (4 credits): Biomedical Applications of Signal Processing

o   BIOENG 1680 (4 credits): Biomedical Applications of Control

·      BIOENG 1630 (3 credits): Biomechanics 1

·      BIOENG 1002 (3 credits): Intramural Internship

·      BIOENG 1150 (3 credits): Biomethods

·      Imaging course selected from:

o   BIOENG 1005 (3 credits): RF Medical Devices

o   BIOENG 1330 (3 credits): Biomedical Imaging

o   BIOENG 1340 (3 credits): Introduction to Medical Imaging and Image Analysis

o   BIOENG 1383 (3 credits): Biomedical Optical Microscopy

o   BIOENG 2385 (3 credits): Engineering Medical Devices for Quantitative Image Analysis & Visualization

o   BIOENG 2505 (3 credits): Multi-Modal Biomedical Imaging Technologies

o   ECE 1390 (3 credits): Introduction to Image Processing/Computer Vision

o   PSY 1471 (3 credits): Mapping Brain Connectivity

o   CMU RI 16-725 (12 units): (Bio)Medical Image Analysis

o   CMU BioSc 03-315 (9 units): Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Neuroscience

o   CMU BioSc 03-534 (9 units): Biological Imaging and Fluorescence Spectroscopy

o   CMU Biomed 42-431 (9 units): Introduction to Biomedical Imaging and Image Analysis

o   CMU Biomed 42-640 (9 units): Computational Bio-Modeling and Visualization

o   CMU Biomed 42-474 (9 units): Introduction to Biophotonics

o   CMU Psych 85-429 (9 units): Cognitive Brain Imaging

·      BIOENG 1160 (3 credits): Senior Design 1

·      BIOENG 1161 (3 credits): Senior Design 2

·      BIOENG 1085 (0 credits/6 required): Introduction to Bioengineering Seminar

 

The Bioengineering Core has been designed to provide students with exposure to the basic engineering disciplines that bioengineers use in preparation for being a functional member of a multidisciplinary team working to creatively solve biomedical problems.

 

BIOENG 1210 and BIOENG 1220 provide knowledge and applications in thermal/fluid engineering which are important in design and operation of cellular engineering and tissue culture applications and artificial organs technology.

 

BIOENG 1310 and BIOENG 1320 provide fundamental knowledge and applications in electrical engineering that are required for data acquisition, signal processing, imaging, and systems control. BIOENG 1255 (biological insights through mathematical modeling), BIOENG 1580 (biological insights through signal processing in general), and BIOENG 1680 (applications in biological control systems) are more in-depth application of concepts presented in BIOENG 1310 and BIOENG 1320.

 

BIOENG 1630, coupled with ENGR 0135, provides knowledge and applications that are required to model and design solutions in such diverse areas as motion and balance, prosthetics design, and soft tissue mechanics.

 

Both BIOENG 1002 and BIOENG 1150 are laboratory, research-based courses that focus on communications skills: BIOENG 1002 on preparation and public presentation of research; BIOENG 1150 on analysis and written communication.

 

Imaging is an integral skill in bioengineering. Several choices are offered to help meet individual needs of students in designing a curriculum relevant to their interests and course of study. While any of the listed courses satisfy the imaging requirement, students are encouraged to seek advisor input with respect to which course might be best for their particular interests. Students can petition the Undergraduate Coordinator to have a new imaging course placed on the list of acceptable courses.

 

Senior Design (BIOENG 1160 & BIOENG 1161) is a unique two-semester capstone sequence that challenges teams of students to develop and implement practical solutions to real problems.

 

Finally, BIOENG 1085 is used both as a vehicle for communication between the department and students and to provide diverse perspectives on the professional practice of bioengineering.

 

1.2.6. Bioengineering Tracks (6 Courses)

While the Bioengineering Core was designed to provide students with exposure to the basic engineering disciplines that bioengineers use in preparation for being a functional member of a multidisciplinary team working to creatively solve biomedical problems, the Bioengineering Tracks offer students an opportunity to focus in greater depth on an area of bioengineering practice relevant to their interests. Students are encouraged to design their own curriculum, within the constraints of the track, to prepare them for their post-graduate goals. The department offers four tracks:

 

·      Bioimaging and Signals

·      Biomechanics

·      Cellular Engineering

·      Medical Product Engineering

 

Each track consists of six courses split between track requirements and track electives (for track specific details refer to the Bioengineering Tracks section). Track requirements are courses that the Track Coordinator and associated track faculty deem essential knowledge for professional practice in the track. Track electives (drawn from a restricted list of courses) offer an opportunity either to explore the track broadly or to focus more narrowly in an area of interest to the student.


As part of planning for post-graduate goals and the advising process, all students are required to develop a comprehensive electives plan (CEP) that details how their choices of track electives and advanced engineering/science/technical electives will help them achieve their individual goals.

Note: Because of the large number of bioengineering students interested in careers in the health sciences (medical doctor, osteopathic doctor, nurse practitioner, physical therapist) post-graduation, CHEM 0310 (3 credits): Organic Chemistry 1 and CHEM 0320 (3 credits): Organic Chemistry 2 are accepted track electives in all tracks.

 

Note: CHEM 0320 (3 credits): Organic Chemistry 2 is a prerequisite for BIOENG 1620 (3 credits): Introduction to Tissue Engineering and BIOENG 1810 (3 credits): Biomaterials and Biocompatability. Students who want to take those courses need to take the CHEM 0310/CHEM 0320 sequence prior to doing so.

Note: Particular minors (see the Minors and Certificates section) are easier to obtain through specific tracks. The key to obtaining a minor that will aid the student in fulfilling post-graduate goals is to start planning early.

 

1.2.7. Required Advanced Engineering/Science/Technical (2 Courses)

Students are required to take two advanced engineering/science/technical elective courses, as developed in their comprehensive electives plan (CEP), that complement their Bioengineering Track electives and will help them meet their post-graduate goals.

 

Advanced engineering/science/technical elective means that if the student has already taken a course in a discipline, the advanced engineering/science/technical elective must be at a more advanced level (depth), i.e., not a course that is a prerequisite for a course already taken or cover a different aspect of the discipline (breadth).

 

Note: The University Catalog states “Students may not earn credit for courses that substantially duplicate the content of other courses for which they have already received credit.” Other departments offer courses that substantially duplicate content in some BIOENG courses (which focus on engineering applications in biology, physiology, and medicine). Known courses under this prohibition that students cannot use for an advanced engineering/science/technical elective include:

 

·      ECE/COE 0031 & MEMS 0031 (duplicates BIOENG 1310)

·      ENGR 0145 (duplicates BIOENG 1630)

·      ENGR 1010 (duplicates BIOENG 1002 & BIOENG 1150)

·      MEMS 0051 (duplicates BIOENG 1210)

·      ECE/COE 1552 & MEMS 1014 (duplicates BIOENG 1320)

 

Note: Students may not use any natural science course (ASTRON, BIOSC, CHEM, GEOL, NROSCI, PHYS) with a course number less than 0100 or described as “for students not majoring in the physical sciences” to satisfy an advanced engineering/science/technical requirement.

Note: Students may use an ENGR study abroad experience, such as the Plus3 program, either as an advanced engineering/science/technical elective or as a HUM/SS elective. If students are planning on using an ENGR study abroad experience as a HUM/SS elective, they must inform the Undergraduate Coordinator before partaking in the course.

Note: Students who successfully complete three co-op rotations can also apply that experience to satisfy one of the advanced engineering/science/technical electives; students in the Medical Product Engineering (MPE) track can use three co-op rotations to satisfy a track elective. Refer to the Cooperative Education for details.

 

2. Bioengineering Tracks

 

The Undergraduate Bioengineering Program offers four tracks that provide a depth component in bioengineering complementary to the breadth of the core curriculum:

 

·      Bioimaging and Signals

·      Biomechanics

·      Cellular Engineering

·      Medical Product Engineering

 

Each track consists of 6 courses, required or drawn from a list of suggested courses, that provide a cohesive, focused, and in-depth area of study within the track. In conjunction with their 2 advanced engineering/science/technical electives, students develop a Comprehensive Electives Plan (CEP; found under Undergraduate Bioengineering Forms) that describes how their choice of track, track courses, and advanced engineering/science/technical electives will help meet their post-graduation goals. Students are strongly encouraged to structure their CEP to obtain a minor or certificate (see Minors and Certificates section for details) that complements and augments their in-depth study. A minor or certificate distinguishes students as individuals who have gone beyond the minimum requirements to get their degree.

 

Note: All bioengineering students must have a minimum of 4 engineering courses (any department) out of the 8 elective courses (6 track courses and 2 advanced engineering/science/technical electives).

 

Note: Because of the large number of bioengineering students interested in careers in the health sciences (medical doctor, osteopathic doctor, nurse practitioner, physical therapist) post-graduation, CHEM 0310 (3 credits): Organic Chemistry 1 and CHEM 0320 (3 credits): Organic Chemistry 2 are accepted track courses in all tracks.

 

Note: To access a list of Bioengineering Faculty and their respective tracks, please refer to the Faculty Research Interests page.

 

2.1. Bioimaging and Signals Track

Track Coordinator: Aaron Batista (apb10@pitt.edu)

The Bioimaging and Signals Track is designed for flexibility so that students are able to tailor their degree within the broad fields of biological signal acquisition and processing. Track students pursue coursework in focus areas such as:

 

·      Bioimaging, including sensing, rendering, interpreting biological images, and imaging devices;

·      Biological signal processing, modeling, measurement, and analysis;

·      Control and dynamic systems; and

·      Neural engineering.

 

The Bioimaging and Signals Track is particularly suitable for students who wish to double major or minor in a related field such as Electrical Engineering, Neuroscience, or Computer Science. With proper planning, students can use their 6 track courses plus 2 advanced engineering/science/technical electives to obtain the minor. Students must justify in their CEP how selected courses contribute to in-depth study in an area related to Bioimaging and Signals. Please consult the Minors and Certificates section for further details about getting a minor. Students should talk with the Undergraduate Coordinator about the possibility of a double major after talking with their advisor.

Bioimaging and Signals Track Requirements

All Bioimaging and Signals Track students are required to take 6 track courses beyond the core Bioengineering requirements, with at least one of them being a Bioimaging course and one being a Biological Signal Processing or Control and Dynamic Systems course. Note that these two courses are in addition to the required biosignals application and imaging courses that students are required to take as part of their core bioengineering course work. Students are free to choose the remaining 4 track courses from any of the preapproved lists provided below.

 

Consistent with their CEP, students can choose courses from bioimaging, biological signal processing, control and dynamic systems, neural engineering, etc. Students should identify their Bioimaging and Signals focus area in the CEP and state why selected courses are important for realizing their post-graduation goals.

 

No prior approval is necessary for a track course chosen from the list of preapproved track courses (see below). Please note that this list is compiled based on track courses taken by students who have previously pursued the Bioimaging and Signals Track. If students are interested in taking a course that is relevant to Bioimaging and Signals as a part of their CEP that is not listed here, they should seek approval from the Track Coordinator prior to enrolling in the course.

 

Note: For courses offered at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU), kindly refer to CMU Schedule of Classes webpage.


Bioimaging

·      Engineering courses

o   BIOENG 1005 (3 credits): RF (Radiofrequency) Medical Devices

o   BIOENG 1330 (3 credits): Biomedical Imaging

o   BIOENG 1340 (3 credits): Introduction to Medical Imaging and Image Analysis

o   BIOENG 1383 (3 credits): Biomedical Optical Microscopy

o   BIOENG 2505 (3 credits): Multi-Modal Biomedical Imaging Technologies

o   ECE 1390 (3 credits): Introduction to Image Processing/Computer Vision

o   Introduction to Biomedical Imaging and Image Analysis (CMU)

o   (Bio)Medical Image Analysis (CMU)

o   Bioimage Informatics (CMU)

o   Optical Image and Radar Processing (CMU)

o   Image, Video, and Multimedia (CMU)

o   Computer Vision (CMU)

·      Science courses

o   Introduction to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (CMU)

o   Biological Imaging and Fluorescence Spectroscopy (CMU)

o   Techniques in Electron Microscopy (CMU)

o   Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Neuroscience (CMU)

o   Computer Graphics I (CMU)

o   Computational Photography (CMU)

Biological Signal Processing

·       Engineering courses

o   BIOENG 1351 (3 credits): Computer Applications in Bioengineering

o   BIOENG 1580 (4 credits): Biomedical Applications of Signal Processing

o   ECE 1472 (3 credits): Analog Communication Systems

o   ECE 1473 (3 credits): Digital Communication Systems

o   ECE 1562 (3 credits): Digital and Analog Filters

o   ECE 1563 (3 credits): Signal Processing Laboratory

o   Vision Sensors (CMU)

Control and Dynamic Systems

·       Engineering courses

o   BIOENG 1680 (4 credits): Biomedical Applications of Control

o   BIOENG 2035 (3 credits): Biomechanical Modeling of Movement

o   BIOENG 2045 (3 credits): Computational Case Studies in Biomedical Engineering

o   MEMS 1045 (3 credits): Automatic Controls

o   Gadgetry (CMU)

o   Introduction to Feedback Control Systems (CMU)

o   Kinematics, Dynamic Systems and Control (CMU)

Neural Engineering

·       Engineering courses

o   BIOENG 1586 (3 credits): Quantitative Systems Neuroscience

o   BIOENG 1615 (3 credits): Introduction to Neural Engineering

o   BIOENG 2650 (3 credits): Learning & Control of Movement

·      Science courses

o   MATH 1800 (3 credits): Intro to Mathematical Neuroscience

o   MATH 3370 (3 credits): Mathematical Neuroscience

o   MATH 3375 (3 credits): Computational Neuroscience Methods

o   NROSCI 1000 (3 credits): Introduction to Neuroscience

o   NROSCI 1012 (3 credits): Neurophysiology

o   Neural Computation (CMU)

o   Computational Models of Neural Systems (CMU)

 

2.2. Biomechanics Track

Track Coordinator: Rakié Cham (rcham@pitt.edu)

Biomechanics is the application of mechanical principles to biological systems. The Biomechanics Track curriculum was designed for flexibility so that students are able to tailor their degree into a focus area that is of interest to them. Examples of such areas include cell biomechanics, tissue/organ biomechanics, orthopaedic biomechanics, design, biomaterials, whole-body biomechanics, human factors, rehabilitation biomechanics, motor control and robotics. The Biomechanics Track curriculum is also designed to ensure that the fundamentals of contemporary biomechanics are covered. The goal is to cover the fundamentals in Biomechanics while still allowing flexibility in individual focus.

 

Students pursuing the Biomechanics Track are encouraged to obtain a minor in Mechanical Engineering, which is a particularly attractive option for students interested in industrial positions post-graduation. With proper planning, Biomechanics students can use their 6 track courses plus 2 advanced engineering/science/technical electives to obtain the minor. Please consult the Minors and Certificates section for further details.

 

Biomechanics Track Requirements

All Biomechanics Track students are required to take:

·      BIOENG 1631 (3 credits): Biomechanics 2 – Introduction to Biodynamics and Biosolid Mechanics;

and at least one of:

o   BIOENG 1632 (3 credits): Biomechanics 3 – Biodynamics of Movement or

o   BIOENG 1633 (3 credits): Biomechanics 4 – Biomechanics of Organs, Tissues, and Cells.

Note: Both courses, that is, BIOENG 1632 & BIOENG 1633, can be used as track courses. Only one is required.

 

Students are free to choose the remaining 4 track courses from the preapproved list provided below. Consistent with their CEP, students can choose courses from bioengineering, industrial engineering, mechanical engineering, robotics, math, biomaterials, cell/molecular biology, nursing, etc. Students should identify their Biomechanics focus area in the CEP and state why selected courses are important to helping realize their post-graduate goals.

 

Preapproved track courses are listed below. Please note that the list is only a sample of courses compiled based on track courses taken by students who have previously pursued the Biomechanics Track. Students may petition the Track Coordinator to have new courses placed on the list. Additionally, if students are interested in taking a course that is relevant to Biomechanics as a part of their CEP that is not listed here, they should seek approval from the Track Coordinator prior to enrolling in the course.

 

Preapproved Track Courses

·      Engineering courses

o   BIOENG 1351 (3 credits): Computer Applications in Bioengineering

o   BIOENG 1810 (3 credits): Biomaterials and Biocompatibility

o   BIOENG 1370 (3 credits): Computational Simulation in Medical Device Design

o   BIOENG 2635 (3 credits): Tribology: Adhesion, Friction, Lubrication, and Wear

o   BIOENG 2650 (3 credits): Learning & Control of Movement

o   ENGR 0022 (3 credits): Materials Structure and Properties

o   HRS 1704 (3 credits): Fundamentals of Rehabilitation Engineering & Assistive Technology

o   IE 1061 (3 credits): Human Factors Engineering

o   MEMS 1015 (3 credits): Rigid-Body Dynamics

o   MEMS 1028 (3 credits): Mechanical Design 1

o   MEMS 1047 (3 credits): Finite Element Analysis

o   ME 2003 (3 credits): Introduction to Continuum Mechanics

o   ME 2045 (3 credits): Linear Control Systems

·       Science courses

o   CHEM 0310 (3 credits): Organic Chemistry 1

o   CHEM 0320 (3 credits): Organic Chemistry 2

o   MATH 1080 (3 credits): Numerical Linear Algebra

o   MATH 1360 (3 credits): Modeling in Applied Math 1

o   NUR 0013 (3 credits): Human Anatomy and Physiology 2

o   REHSCI 1200 (3 credits): Human Anatomy

o   REHSCI 1220 (2 credits): Kinesiology and Biomechanics and REHSCI 1221 (1 credit): Kinesiology and Biomechanics Lab

o   HRS 1701 (2 credits): Introduction to Prosthetics and Orthotics

Note: HRS 1701 is a 2-credit course. Since students are required to take 18 credits (6 track courses) to fulfill their track requirements, they should consider registering for an additional course (perhaps another 1, 2, or 3-credit course with prior approval from the Track Coordinator) to cover the deficit. Alternatively, students interested in HRS 1701 could consider enrolling in the 2-semester sequence NUR 0012 (3 credits): Human Anatomy and Physiology 1/NUR 0002 (1 credit): Nursing Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory 1 and NUR 0013 (3 credits): Human Anatomy and Physiology 2/NUR 0003 (1 credit): Nursing Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory 2 to meet the track requirements as well as to satisfy the Human Physiology requirement plus an advanced engineering/science/technical elective.

 

2.3. Cellular Engineering Track

Track Coordinator: Lance Davidson (lad43@pitt.edu)

The Cellular Engineering Track provides students with the opportunity to focus in areas related to cellular, tissue, and organ engineering. The track is designed for students interested in a quantitative understanding of the native biological structure/function at various levels of organization (molecules-cells-tissues-organs) and in leveraging that understanding to manipulate processes and/or engineer artifacts for biomedical applications. Students receive a solid grounding in cell and molecular biology, organic chemistry, biochemistry, tissue engineering, biomaterials, and biocompatibility with diversification in allied bioscience fields such as immunology, genetics, and microbiology.

 

Students pursuing the Cellular Engineering Track are encouraged to obtain a minor in Chemistry, which requires only the 2-credit Organic Chemistry laboratory (i.e., CHEM 0345) in addition to the required track courses. Please consult the Minors and Certificates section for further details.

 

Cellular Engineering Track Requirements

All Cellular Engineering Track students are required to take:

·      CHEM 0310 (3 credits): Organic Chemistry 1;

·      CHEM 0320 (3 credits): Organic Chemistry 2;

and a choice of:

o   CHEM 1810 (3 credits): Chemical Biology, or

o   CHEM 1880 (3 credits): Chemical Biology for Engineers, or

o   BIOSC 1000 (3 credits): Introduction to Biochemistry, or

o   BIOSC 1810 (3 credits): Macromolecular Structure and Function.

 

Students are free to choose the remaining 3 track courses from the preapproved list provided below. Consistent with their CEP, students can choose courses from a list of acceptable electives. Students should state why selected courses are important to helping realize their post-graduate goals.

Preapproved track courses are listed below. Students may petition the Track Coordinator to have new courses placed on the list. Additionally, if students are interested in taking a course that is relevant to Cellular Engineering as a part of their CEP that is not listed here, they should seek approval from the Track Coordinator prior to enrolling in the course.

Preapproved Track Courses

·       Engineering courses

o   BIOENG 1075 (3 credits): Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology Laboratory Techniques

o   BIOENG 1218 (3 credits): Emerging Biomedical Technologies (Honors)

o   BIOENG 1351 (3 credits): Computer Applications in Bioengineering

o   BIOENG 1533 (3 credits): Controlled Drug Delivery

o   BIOENG 1615 (3 credits): Introduction to Neural Engineering

o   BIOENG 1620 (3 credits): Introduction to Tissue Engineering

o   BIOENG 1633 (3 credits): Biomechanics 4 – Biomechanics of Organs, Tissues, and Cells

o   BIOENG 1810 (3 credits): Biomaterials and Biocompatibility

o   BIOENG 2820 (3 credits): Synthetic Biology – Engineering Living Systems

·       Science courses

o   BIOENG 2520 (6 credits): Molecular Cell Biology and Biophysics
Note: This course counts as two electives

o   BIOSC 0350 (3 credits): Genetics

o   BIOSC 0355 (3 credits): Genetics (Honors)

o   BIOSC 1760 (3 credits): Immunology

o   BIOSC 1850 (3 credits): Microbiology

 

2.4. Medical Product Engineering Track

Track Coordinator: Mark Gartner (gartnerm@pitt.edu)

Students choosing the Medical Product Engineering (MPE) Track will leverage the medical product design process to identify unmet clinical needs and develop products that contribute to human health and welfare. Facets of this process include customer discovery, design conceptualization and prototyping, identification of appropriate regulatory and reimbursement pathways, and application of key elements of the FDA Quality System Regulation with particular focus on the Design Controls. In addition, MPE Track requires student exposure to other elements unique to the medical product design process including clinician, patient, and caregiver interaction, risk identification and management, economic considerations, and implementation of computer-aided design and simulation tools. The MPE Track provides students the option to pursue a technical or business focus via customization of individual curriculums to align with their post-graduation plans. For example, the MPE business focus intends to provide expanded exposure to business model discovery techniques, facets of business management unique to the development of medical products, and an understanding of the marketing and management of medical products.

 

With proper planning, MPE Track students can structure their CEP to earn a minor in Mechanical Engineering, a minor in Industrial Engineering, a Certificate in Product Realization, or a Certificate in Engineering for Humanity. Please consult Minors and Certificates for further details.

 

Medical Product Engineering Track Requirements
All MPE Track students are required to take:

·      MEMS 0024 (3 credits): Introduction to Mechanical Engineering Design; or

·      IE 1051 (3 credits): Engineering Product Design; or

·      BIOENG 1024 (3 credits): Medical Product Design

Note: The combination of BIOENG 1024 and BIOENG 0050 (1 credit): Introduction to SolidWorks is a possible alternative to MEMS 0024 for Bioengineering students that wish to obtain a Mechanical Engineering Minor.

and a choice of:

o   BUSERV 1985 (3 credits): Small Business Management, or

o   BUSMKT 1431 (3 credits): Product Development and Management.

 

Students are free to choose the remaining 4 track courses from the preapproved list provided below. Consistent with their CEP, students can choose courses from a list of acceptable electives that provide options to achieve an MPE technical or business focus. Students should state why selected courses are important to helping realize their post-graduate goals.

Preapproved track courses are listed below. Students may petition the Track Coordinator to have new courses placed on the list. Additionally, if students are interested in taking a course that is relevant to Medical Product Design as a part of their CEP that is not listed here, they should seek approval from the Track Coordinator prior to enrolling in the course.

Preapproved Track Courses

·       MPE business focus

o   BUSMKT 1431 (3 credits): Product Development and Management

o   BUSENV 1785 (3 credits): Social Entrepreneurship

o   BUSERV 1985 (3 credits): Small Business Management

o   BUSSPP 1750 (3 credits): Commercializing New Technologies

o   BIOENG 2150 (3 credits): Medical Product Ideation

o   BIOENG 2165 (3 credits): Medical Product Entrepreneurship

o   BIOENG 2166 (3 credits): Managing Medical Product R&D

o   IE 1040 (3 credits): Engineering Economic Analysis

o   IE 1080 (3 credits): Supply chain analysis

o   ENGR 1060 (3 credits): Social Entrepreneurship – Engineering for Humanity

o   ENGR 1080 (3 credits): Lean Launchpad: Evidence-Based Entrepreneurship

o   ENGR 1090P: Engineering Cooperative Education (see Cooperative Education for details)

·       MPE technical focus

o   BIOENG 1351 (3 credits): Computer Applications in Bioengineering

o   BIOENG 1355 (3 credits): Medical Product Regulation and Reimbursement

o   BIOENG 1370 (3 credits): Computational Simulation in Medical Device Design

o   BIOENG 1810 (3 credits): Biomaterials and Biocompatibility

o   BIOENG 2150 (3 credits): Medical Product Ideation

o   BIOENG 2151 (3 credits): Medical Product Development

o   CEE 1618 (3 credits): Design for the Environment

o   ENGR 0022 (3 credits): Materials Structure and Properties

o   ENGR 1050 (3 credits): Product Realization

o   ENGR 1610 (3 credits): Product Realization for Global Opportunities

o   ENGR 1716 (3 credits): The Art of Making

o   ENGR 1090P: Engineering Cooperative Education (see Cooperative Education for details)

o   IE 1061 (3 credits): Human Factors Engineering

o   IE 1201 (3 credits): Biomaterials and Biomanufacturing

o   IE 1052 (3 credits): Manufacturing Systems Analysis

o   IE 1089 (3 credits): Rapid Prototyping Additive Manufacturing

o   MEMS 1028 (3 credits): Mechanical Design 1

o   MEMS 1049 (3 credits): Mechatronics

 

3. Undergraduate Bioengineering Course Descriptions

 

3.1. BIOENG 0050: Workshop in Bioengineering Design

Credits: 1 (Satisfactory/No Credit)

 

Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring

 

Description: Students are introduced to Bioengineering design use of the SolidWorks software suite. SolidWorks is one of several computer aided engineering software packages (AutoCAD and ProEngineer are other examples) that is widely used in industry and academia. Skills learned (1) will help with Bioengineering design projects, and (2) are easily translated to other computer engineering packages such as AutoCAD or ProEngineer. The workshop consists of weekly SolidWorks-based practice assignments (tutorials) that must be completed to receive an S (satisfactory) grade in the course.

 

Prerequisites: Bioengineering students only. Instructor permission required.

 

Course Objectives: Upon completing the course, the student should be able to use SolidWorks to develop professional quality engineering drawings and simulations.

 

Topics Covered:

·       Sketching and basic modeling skills

·       Drawing assembly basics

·       Tolerancing

·       Engineering drawings

·       Modeling and simulation

·       Best practices

 

Schedule: Class meets once a week for 50 minutes.

 

3.2. BIOENG 0051: Workshop in Medical Devices – The Basics

Credits: 1 (Satisfactory/No Credit)

 

Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring

 

Description: Reverse engineering of medical devices is used to introduce students to basic terminology in the medical device field, the coupling of design with function, and the processes involved in moving from device conception to product. The course (1) emphasizes the significance of curiosity and information seeking in device development, 2) will help with Bioengineering design projects, and (3) will expand knowledge of devices in general, along with needs assessment. Multiple medical specialties will be covered, along with basic function of devices (diagnostics, treatment, monitoring, etc.). The workshop will use hands on learning experiences, focusing on devices that can be taken apart. After discussion of device purpose and function, students will be challenged to identify potential design improvements. Students are expected to be active participants in the seminar.

 

Prerequisites: Bioengineering students only. Instructor permission required.

 

Course Objectives: Upon completing the course, the student should be conversant with medical device terminology, be able to state the basic elements involved in needs assessment and be able to identify hurdles in medical device development.

 

Topics Covered:

·       Medical device terminology

·       Reverse engineering: device function/purpose

·       Importance of needs assessment

·       Design controls

·       Hurdles to medical device development

·       Impact of deployment site on medical device development

 

Schedule: Class meets once a week for 75 minutes. 1-2 visits (field trips) to local medical device companies are expected to be offered (attendance optional), along with guest lectures from company representatives and possible physicians on specific devices and procedures.

 

3.3. BIOENG 0052: Workshop in OpenSim

Credits: 1 (Satisfactory/No Credit)

 

Semesters Offered: Spring

 

Description: Computational models and simulations are tremendously useful tools for understanding human movement control. It is not always straightforward to identify cause-and-effect relationships through experiments alone and computational modeling and simulation techniques can complement experimental approaches – e.g., models can provide estimates of important variables such as muscle forces that are difficult to measure experimentally.

 

OpenSim is an open-source software package that enables users to build, exchange, and analyze computer models of the musculoskeletal system and dynamic simulations of movement (Delp et al., 2007). The purpose of this course is to introduce students to OpenSim by demonstrating the utility of graphics-based modeling and simulation. Specifically, students will learn how to use OpenSim tools, through both the graphical user interface (GUI) and Application Programming Interface (API) that uses MATLAB scripting, to analyze and simulate models and motions.

 

The course consists of weekly practice assignments that must be completed to receive a satisfactory (S) grade.

 

Prerequisites: Bioengineering students only. Instructor permission required.

 

Course Objectives: Upon completing the course, the student should be able to use OpenSim to analyze and develop forward dynamic simulations of movement.

 

Topics Covered:

·       Data preparation for use in OpenSim

·       Model scaling

·       Inverse kinematics

·       Inverse dynamics

·       Static optimization (an extension to inverse dynamics)

·       Computed muscle control (muscle-driven forward simulations of motion)

 

Schedule: Class meets once a week for 50 to 75 minutes.

 

3.4. BIOENG 0053: Workshop in Statistical Design of Experiments

Credits: 1 (Satisfactory/No Credit)

 

Semesters Offered: Fall

 

Description: Engineers use experiments for a variety of reasons, some of which are: determine whether one treatment is better than an alternative; determine parameters in a descriptive model; and determine accurate physical properties of a material. Simply put, experiments take time and can be expensive. Statistical design of experiments (DOE) is a tool to maximize the amount of relevant information gained while minimizing the amount of experimentation required to obtain that information. After discussion of general experimental design principles, Design-Ease® software is used to introduce students to DOE through a series of workshops that highlight the importance of DOE in engineering practice. The course consists of weekly practice assignments that must be completed to receive a satisfactory (S) grade.

 

Prerequisites: BIOENG 1000 or ENGR 0020. Bioengineering students only. Instructor permission required.

 

Course Objectives: Upon completing the course, the student should be able to design an experiment using statistical design of experiment principles to maximize knowledge gained from the experiment.

 

Topics Covered:

·       Randomization / completely randomized designs

·       Data display

·       Analysis of variance

·       Factorial design

·       Hurdles to medical device development

·       Power analysis / sample size

·       Response surface design

 

Schedule: Class meets once a week for 75 minutes.

 

References

·       Oehlert GW. A First Course in Design and Analysis of Experiments. ISBN 0-7167-3510-5 (2010). http://users.stat.umn.edu/~gary/book/fcdae.pdf

·       Anderson MJ, Whitcomb PJ. DOE Simplified: Practical Tools for Effective Experimentation, Third Edition. CRC Press. ISBN 978-1482218947 (2007). http://www.amazon.com/dp/1482218941/ref=rdr_ext_tmb

 

3.5. BIOENG 0054: Workshop in Design for Manufacturability

Credits: 1 (Satisfactory/No Credit)

 

Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring

 

Description: Design for Manufacturability (DFM) provides a systematic methodology that can be used to analyze product design for improvements in assembly and manufacturing. Students will use DFM to redesign current products for changes in manufacture that lead to reduction in production cost and improved operability/customer satisfaction. Students will employ modern software tools that accurately model parts for specific manufacturing operations, model part costs, simplify products, find specific avenues to reduce manufacturing and assembly costs, benchmark products, and quantify improvements.

 

Prerequisites: (BIOENG 0050 and BIOENG 1024) or MEMS 0024. Bioengineering students only. Instructor permission required.

 

Course Objectives: Students will gain hands-on experience incorporating the DFM concepts in a project. Upon completing the course, the students should be able to describe the utility of DFM in product development and early manufacturing design, be able to quantitatively evaluate the impact of design choices on manufacturing cost and be able to use modern quality control concepts and approaches.

 

Topics Covered:

·       Steps for applying DFM during product design

·       DFM guidelines for assembly

·       Strategies in component(s) design

·       Designing for automation

·       Designing in quality/reliability

·       Standardization

·       Designing in teams

·       Early resolution of issues

·       Optimizing vendor participation

·       Off-the-shelf parts

·       Modular design

·       Product definition

·       Creativity

·       Brainstorming

·       Total cost

·       Modern philosophies and practices

o   Lean Manufacturing

o   Quality control in Manufacturing Systems

o   Use of Software Tools for Analysis of Manufacturing Cost and Time

·       Evaluation of alternatives

 

Schedule: Class meets once a week for 60 minutes.

 

3.6. BIOENG 1000: Statistics for Bioengineering

Credits: 4 (Letter Grade Only)

 

Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring

 

Description: Bioengineering statistics presents the basic statistical methods relevant to engineering and clinical applications. Specifically, assumptions inherent in statistical analyses, calculation of statistical parameters, automated statistical methods using software, interpretation of the meaning of statistical parameters, and design of experiments conducive to proper statistics are explored through use of biological and medical examples that reinforce concepts of the course.

 

Prerequisites: MATH 0230 or MATH 0235 (or equivalent). Bioengineering students only.

 

Course Objectives: Upon completing the course, the student will be able to design an experiment using statistical design of experiments principles to maximize knowledge gained from the experiment and interpret results from statistical analysis of the design.

 

Topics Covered:

·       Randomization/completely randomized designs

·       Analysis of variance

·       Probability and the binomial distribution

·       Statistical tests based on the normal distribution

·       Non-parametric tests

·       Power analysis/sample size

 

Schedule: Class meets twice a week for 75 minutes, laboratory once a week for 75 minutes.

 

3.7. BIOENG 1002: Intramural Internship

Credits: 3 (Letter Grade Only)

 

Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring

 

Description: Students employ practical experience, gained from mentored research in an academic environment, that includes project planning, design of experiments, and analysis of results to develop professional quality oral presentation and abstract writing skills. Emphasis is placed on critical analysis of research projects, development of technical abstract writing skills, and development of professional quality visual aids that accompany oral presentations. The course culminates with an oral presentation at a technical symposium.

 

Prerequisites: BIOENG 1000 or ENGR 0020. Bioengineering students only. Instructor permission required.

 

Course Objectives: Upon completing the course, the student should be able to prepare a professional quality abstract documenting background, methodology, and results from a research project and make a professional quality oral presentation describing the research.

 

Topics Covered:

·       Library Skills

·       Project planning

·       Oral project overview

·       Literature report

·       Preliminary project presentation

·       Oral interview presentation

·       Formal oral presentation

·       Technical report (abstract)

 

Schedule: Class meets twice a week for 75 minutes.

 

Important BIOENG 1002 Information:

·       Students must file a BIOENG 1002 Application (found under Undergraduate Bioengineering Forms) to receive instructor permission for enrollment;

·       Students must have junior or senior standing in Bioengineering;

·       Mentored research can be with any faculty member listed on the Bioengineering website, any faculty member in the Pittsburgh area (e.g., CMU, Duquesne, Allegheny General) performing bioengineering research, or programs outside of Pittsburgh sponsored by the Department of Bioengineering;

·       Students are encouraged to contact (e-mail) faculty mentors about volunteering in their laboratory, but let the mentor know the research would be for BIOENG 1002;

·       BIOENG 1002 credit is given for mastering the skills associated with oral presentation of research and abstract writing of research, not for the research itself. As such, students can either volunteer or be paid (at the mentor’s discretion) for research performed in order to take the course;

·       Students must start in the laboratory the semester prior to taking the class. Preferably, the project should also start the semester before taking the class.

 

3.8. BIOENG 1005: RF (Radiofrequency) Medical Devices and Applications of Electromagnetics in Medicine

Credits: 3 (Letter Grade Only)

 

Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring

 

Description: The course will cover topics related to the applications of electromagnetics and RF in medicine and in other devices that can cause thermal safety hazards. Topics such as Maxwell Equations, Wave Equations, Transmission Lines, Electromagnetic Theorems, Introduction to Antennas, and Introduction to Computational Electromagnetics will be presented. The class will include analyses of several RF devices used in medical applications and/or have electromagnetic safety implications such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), biological sensors (brain machine interface), RF ablation, and cell phones.

 

Prerequisites: BIOENG 1310 (or equivalent).

 

Course Objectives: Upon completing the course, the student should be able to describe how to apply fundamental electromagnetic principles to set up and solve problems in RF devices used in medical applications.

 

Topics Covered:

·       Introduction – Faraday’s Law

·       Full Maxwell Eqns.

·       Wave Eqn. and solutions (time domain)

·       Plane waves and Polarization

·       Lossy media

·       Poynting vector

·       Vectors, vector functions, gradient, divergence, curl

·       Coulomb’s Law, Gauss’s Law, Ampere’s Law, Biot-Savart Law, Ohm’s Law

·       Laplace and Possion equations

·       Potential

·       Conductors, dielectrics

·       Permeability, magnetic materials

·       Boundary conditions

·       Thermal effects of antennas in cell phones

·       Thermal effects of antennas in implanted devices (MRI and biological sensors)

·       Introduction to computational electromagnetics

·       Electromagnetics in MRI

·       MRI RF Coils

·       Superconducting wires for MRI scanners

 

Schedule: Class meets twice a week for 75 minutes.

 

3.9. BIOENG 1024: Medical Product Design

Credits: 3 (Letter Grade Only)

 

Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring

 

Description: This course has been designed to provide an opportunity to learn the fundamentals of medical product design. The overarching goal of this course is to focus on the basic sketching and low- and medium-resolution prototyping to support the design process including ethnography. Course content will include instruction on sketching (pencil and paper-based), low- and medium-resolution prototyping (e.g., foam core and 3D printing), and other related topics such as material and adhesive specification. A secondary goal of this course is to prepare students to implement some of these practices during Senior Design.

 

Prerequisites: ENGR 0011 or ENGR 0015 or ENGR 0711 or ET 0011.

 

Course Objectives: Upon completing the course, the student should be able to use basic sketching and low- and medium-resolution prototyping to quickly and effectively develop a physical model of a proposed solution to a clinical problem. The student will also be able to evaluate what materials, adhesives, and ultimate manufacturing methodologies that may be suitable for actual clinical product. Finally, an understanding of the design process and, in particular, design output such as dimensioned and toleranced drawings will be discussed.

 

Topics Covered:

·       Introduction to sketching;

·       Foam core-based prototyping;

·       Human factor analysis and ethnography;

·       Medical product design process;

·       FDA Quality System Regulation and Design Controls;

·       Medical plastics;

·       Dimensioning and tolerancing.

 

Schedule: Class meets twice weekly for 75 minutes.

 

3.10. BIOENG 1050: Artificial Organs (Lung and Vascular)

Credits: 3 (Letter Grade Only)

 

Semesters Offered: Rotates Fall and Spring semesters in sequence with BIOENG 1051 and BIOENG 1052.

 

Description: Artificial Organs is the first of a three-course sequence that explores design, development, and clinical use of artificial organ technology. Each course in the series is stand-alone and, as such, is not a prerequisite for any other course in the series. Students may take one, two, or all three courses.

 

Artificial Organs is directed toward artificial lung and vascular prostheses. The basic physiology of each system (lung and vascular) is reviewed with emphasis on identifying the bioengineering design requirements for appropriate organ replacement systems. Commercially available systems are analyzed from the point of view (where applicable) of mass transfer efficiency; biomechanic and hemodynamic similarity to the host; and size and efficiency of the device. Students will be required to design an artificial organ consistent with the above-mentioned considerations.

 

Prerequisites: BIOENG 1220 (or equivalent).

 

Course Objectives: Upon completing the course, the student should be able to describe the fundamental engineering principles related to lung and vascular physiology and apply the fundamental principles to design improvements and/or new designs for artificial lung and vascular prostheses.

 

Topics Covered:

·       Lung physiology

·       Extracorporeal membrane oxygenators

·       Extracorporeal CO2 removal

·       Implantable artificial lung

·       Vascular anatomy

·       Vascular pathology

·       Vascular replacement (natural/synthetic)

 

Schedule: Class meets twice a week for 75 minutes each time or once a week for 2.5 hours. Clinical field trips may be scheduled during the first part of the term.

 

3.11. BIOENG 1051: Artificial Organs 2 (Blood and Heart)

Credits: 3 (Letter Grade Only)

 

Semesters Offered: Rotates Fall and Spring semesters in sequence with BIOENG 1050 and BIOENG 1052.

 

Description: Artificial Organs 2 is the second of a three-course sequence that explores design, development, and clinical use of artificial organ technology. Each course in the series is stand-alone and, as such, is not a prerequisite for any other course in the series. Students may take one, two, or all three courses.

 

Artificial Organs 2 is focused on artificial blood and artificial heart. The basic physiology of each system (blood and heart) is reviewed with emphasis on identifying the bioengineering design requirements for appropriate organ replacement systems. Commercially available systems are analyzed from the point of view (where applicable) of mass transfer efficiency; biomechanic and hemodynamic similarity to the host; and size and efficiency of the device. Students will be required to design an artificial organ consistent with the above-mentioned considerations.

 

Prerequisites: BIOENG 1220 (or equivalent).

 

Course Objectives: Upon completing the course, the student should be able to describe the fundamental engineering principles related to blood and lung physiology and apply the fundamental principles to design improvements and/or new designs for artificial blood substitutes and artificial heart devices.

 

Topics Covered:

·       Artificial blood substitutes

o   blood properties

o   perfluorocarbon fluids

o   cross-linked hemoglobin fluids

·       Artificial heart

o   circulatory physiology

o   blood flow

o   intra-aortic blood pump

o   total artificial heart

o   ventricular assist devices

 

Schedule: Class meets twice a week for 75 minutes each time or once a week for 2.5 hours. Clinical field trips may be scheduled during the first part of the term.

 

3.12. BIOENG 1052: Artificial Organs 3 (Kidney and Liver)

Credits: 3 (Letter Grade Only)

 

Semesters Offered: Rotates Fall and Spring semesters in sequence with BIOENG 1050 and BIOENG 1051.

 

Description: Artificial Organs 3 is the third of a three-course sequence that explores design, development, and clinical use of artificial organ technology. Each course in the series is stand-alone and, as such, is not a prerequisite for any other course in the series. Students may take one, two, or all three courses.

 

Artificial Organs 3 is focused upon artificial kidney and artificial liver. The basic physiology of each system (kidney and liver) is reviewed with emphasis on identifying the bioengineering design requirements for appropriate organ replacement systems. Commercially available systems are analyzed from the point of view (where applicable) of mass transfer efficiency; biomechanic and hemodynamic similarity to the host; and size and efficiency of the device. Students will be required to design an artificial organ consistent with the above-mentioned considerations.

 

Prerequisites: BIOENG 1220 (or equivalent).

 

Course Objectives: Upon completing the course, the student should be able to describe the fundamental engineering principles related to kidney and liver physiology and apply the fundamental principles to design improvements and/or new designs for artificial kidney and artificial liver.

 

Topics Covered:

·       Artificial kidney

o   hemodialysis

o   hemofiltration

·       Artificial liver

o   blood detoxification

o   bioartificial (cell-based) liver support systems

 

Schedule: Class meets twice a week for 75 minutes each time or once a week for 2.5 hours. Field trips may include a visit to a dialysis center.

 

3.13. BIOENG 1070: Introductory Cell Biology 1

Credits: 3 (Letter Grade Only)

 

Semesters Offered: Fall

 

Description: Principles of cell biology in higher organisms: structure, function, biosynthesis, and macromolecular organization with a focus on macromolecular organization and function from a quantitative systems perspective.

 

Prerequisites: Bioengineering Sophomore or Department permission.

 

Course Objectives: Upon completing the two-course sequence, BIOENG 1070 and 1071, students should be able to (1) demonstrate understanding of the principles of cell structure and function, (2) describe the experimental tools used to understand cellular function such as molecular genetic techniques, biochemical analysis, and microscopy, and (3) use systems approaches to understand how cellular processes are integrated.

 

Topics Covered:

·       Structure and function of cellular organelles

·       Properties of biomolecules; cellular membrane and transport

·       Cell metabolism and energetics

·       Genetics and principles of genetic engineering

·       Protein synthesis and sorting

 

Schedule: Class meets twice a week for 75 minutes each day. Recitation meets once a week for 75 minutes.

 

3.14. BIOENG 1071: Introductory Cell Biology 2

Credits: 3 (Letter Grade Only)

 

Semesters Offered: Spring

 

Description: Continuation of BIOENG 1070. Principles of cell biology in higher organisms: structure, function, biosynthesis, and macromolecular organization with a focus on macromolecular organization and function from a quantitative systems perspective.

 

Prerequisites: BIOENG 1070.

 

Course Objectives: Upon completing the two-course sequence, BIOENG 1070 and 1071, students should be able to (1) demonstrate understanding of the principles of cell structure and function, (2) describe the experimental tools used to understand cellular function such as molecular genetic techniques, biochemical analysis, and microscopy, and (3) use systems approaches to understand how cellular processes are integrated.

 

Topics Covered:

·       Cell motility

·       Signal transduction

·       Cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion

·       Extracellular matrix

·       Examples of cell biology will be explored in depth where multiple cellular processes are functionally integrated such as the case of stem cell biology, immunology, and vasculogenesis.

 

Schedule: Class meets three times a week for 50 minutes each day. Recitation meets once a week for 50 minutes.

 

3.15. BIOENG 1072: Honors Introductory Cell Biology 2

Credits: 3 (Letter Grade Only)

 

Semesters Offered: Spring

 

Description: Continuation of BIOENG 1070. Principles of cell biology in higher organisms: structure, function, biosynthesis, and macromolecular organization with a focus on macromolecular organization and function from a quantitative systems perspective. In addition to the materials covered in BIOENG 1071, BIOENG 1072 is accompanied by a weekly one-hour seminar in which original research articles pertinent to cell biology are presented and discussed.

 

Prerequisites: BIOENG 1070 and 3.25 GPA or instructor permission.

 

Course Objectives: Upon completing the two-course sequence, BIOENG 1070 and 1072, students should be able to (1) demonstrate understanding of the principles of cell structure and function, (2) describe the experimental tools used to understand cellular function such as molecular genetic techniques, biochemical analysis, and microscopy, and (3) use systems approaches to understand how cellular processes are integrated.

 

Topics Covered:

·       Cell motility

·       Signal transduction

·       Cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion

·       Extracellular matrix

·       Examples of cell biology will be explored in depth where multiple cellular processes are functionally integrated such as the case of stem cell biology, immunology, and vasculogenesis.

 

Schedule: Class meets three times a week for 50 minutes each day. Recitation meets once a week for 50 minutes. Seminar meets once a week for 50 minutes.

 

3.16. BIOENG 1075: Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology Laboratory Techniques

Credits: 3 (Letter Grade Only)

 

Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring

 

Description: An undergraduate laboratory course designed to complement theoretical knowledge learned in BIOENG 1070 & BIOENG 1071. The course, which includes a didactic component, provide students with hands-on experience with cell culture, cellular response to biomaterials, visualization of cellular components, image analysis, fundamental protein-related techniques (isolation, purification and analyses), fundamental molecular biology techniques, and functional measurements in cells.

 

Prerequisites: BIOENG 1070.

 

Course Objectives: Upon completing the course, the student will have acquired “hands-on” skills in basic techniques in cell biology, biochemistry and molecular biology and be able to apply them in practice.

 

Topics Covered:

·       Cell culture techniques

·       Cell proliferation assay

·       Light microscopy (phase and fluorescence)

·       Protein extraction/SDS-PAGE/western blot

·       Bacterial expression and purification of protein

·       Plasmid purification

·       PCR

·       Fundamentals of cloning

 

Schedule: Lecture meets once per week for two hours, laboratory meets once per week for three hours.

 

3.17. BIOENG 1085: Introduction to Bioengineering Seminar

Credits: 0 (Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory)

 

Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring

 

Description: Seminar is designed to acquaint students with aspects of bioengineering that are not normally encountered in the classroom or extracurricular activity settings. As such, Seminar is a vehicle to provide important information and communicate materials that students need to know to maximize their educational experience and develop post-graduation plans. Emphasis is placed on career planning and development and options available in the undergraduate program that will help realize post-graduation goals. Bioengineering students are required to register for, and satisfactorily complete, BIOENG 1085 six times.

 

Prerequisites: Bioengineering students only.

 

Course Objectives: Student awareness of opportunities that are available and knowledge about how to utilize the opportunities for their benefit.

 

Topics Covered (not exhaustive):

·       Options available in the Bioengineering program (track area, faculty research, degree progress/planning)

·       Options available through the Swanson School of Engineering (study abroad, co-op, minors)

·       Options available through the University (study abroad, dual majors, career services, preprofessional health services)

·       Career paths for engineers (industry, graduate school, medical school, law school)

 

Schedule: Class meets once a week for 50 minutes.

 

3.18. BIOENG 1086: Bioengineering Seminar for Minors

Credits: 0 (Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory)

 

Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring

 

Description: Selected, bioengineering-related topics are presented in a one-hour lecture format by members of the bioengineering community of both the University of Pittsburgh and other institutions.

 

Prerequisites: Undergraduates in other departments obtaining a Minor in Bioengineering.

 

Course Objectives: Student awareness of opportunities that are available and knowledge about how to utilize the opportunities for their benefit.

 

Topics Covered (not exhaustive):

·       Bioengineering-related topics

·       Career paths for engineers (industry, graduate school, medical school, law school)

 

Schedule: Class meets once a week for 50 minutes.

 

3.19. BIOENG 1095: Special Projects

Credits: 1 to 6 (Letter Grade Only)

 

Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

 

Description: Special Projects provides an opportunity for students to develop an individual research project under the guidance of a faculty member/mentor. Projects can involve laboratory research, engineering design, or instructional development. While the project must be related to bioengineering, the mentor can be a faculty member in any department or hospital affiliated with the University of Pittsburgh.

 

Prerequisites: A BIOENG 1095 Application (found under Undergraduate Bioengineering Forms) must be completed and approved prior to registration for BIOENG 1095.

 

 

Restrictions:

·       Students cannot be paid to perform any project work conducted for BIOENG 1095 credit;

·       Bioengineering students can register for at most two credits of BIOENG 1095 prior to completing BIOENG 1002: Intramural Internship;

·       Bioengineering students can use only one 3-credit BIOENG 1095 to satisfy degree requirements.

 

Additional Description: A written report documenting the project and project outcomes is required. Typical report format (abstract, introduction, methods, results, discussion, references) is expected. The length of the report should reflect the number of credits received. The report must be submitted to both the Undergraduate Coordinator, Department of Bioengineering, and the mentor. The mentor will evaluate the quality of the project and report and submit a letter grade recommendation to the Undergraduate Coordinator.

 

3.20. BIOENG 1096: Undergraduate Teaching Experience

Credits: 1 or 2 (Satisfactory/No Credit)

 

Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring

 

Description: Undergraduate Teaching Experience provides students an opportunity to volunteer as an Undergraduate Teaching Assistant (TA) or Grader. Undergraduates can participate in helping develop and deliver lecture content, managing recitations or laboratories, developing and/or grading quizzes, evaluating homework, and general review of course materials.

 

Prerequisites: A BIOENG 1096 Application (found under Undergraduate Bioengineering Forms) must be completed and approved prior to registration for BIOENG 1096.

 

Restrictions:

·       Students registered for BIOENG 1096 cannot be paid for work associated with the teaching experience;

·       Faculty are generally responsible for recruiting undergraduate TAs for their course;

·       Students are encouraged to contact faculty if they have a particular interest in serving as a TA for a course.

 

3.21. BIOENG 1150: Bioengineering Methods & Applications

Credits: 3 (Letter Grade Only)

 

Semesters Offered: Spring

 

Description: Bioengineering Methods & Applications uses laboratory experiences to illustrate principles taught in several bioengineering core classes, such as:

·       BIOENG 1070 & BIOENG 1071: Cell Biology

·       BIOENG 1210: Bioengineering Thermodynamics

·       BIOENG 1220: Biotransport Phenomena

·       BIOENG 1310: Signals and Systems (Bioinstrumentation)

·       BIOENG 1630: Biomechanics 1 - Mechanical Principles of Biological Systems

which are pre- or co-requisites for taking BIOENG 1150.

 

In addition to being exposed to particular laboratory skills for each of the experimental modules in the course, students are expected to practice previously developed skills in technical writing, creating tables and graphs, data analysis, and statistics to create professional quality laboratory reports that document each module.

 

Corequisites: BIOENG 1071 or BIOENG 1072 and BIOENG 1220 and BIOENG 1310 and BIOENG 1320 and BIOENG 1630.

 

Course Objectives: Upon completing the course, the student should be able to state and describe the basic components of a laboratory report and create well-written archival documents that reflect professional quality work.

 

Laboratory topics may include:

·       Biorheology (Biotransport)

·       Surface Tension (Biothermodynamics)

·       Electrochemistry (Biothermodynamics)

·       Exercise Physiology (Biothermodynamics)

·       Ligaments (Biomechanics)

·       Motion Analysis – Balance (Biomechanics)

·       Motion Analysis – Gait (Biomechanics)

·       Signal Acquisition (Biological Signals)

·       Light Microscopy (Cell Biology)

·       Tribology (Biomechanics)

·       RF Imaging (Biological Signals)

 

Schedule: Class meets once a week for 75 minutes; laboratory once a week for 3 hours.

 

3.22. BIOENG 1160: Bioengineering Design 1

Credits: 3 (Letter Grade Only)

 

Semesters Offered: Fall

 

Description: The two-course sequence, Bioengineering Design 1 & 2, is a mentored opportunity for the student to synthesize and extend skills and knowledge acquired during the undergraduate education experience in design (or redesign) of a biomedical product or equivalent. Students are exposed to key facets of the medical product design process and the unique regulatory requirements for biomedical products. Student teams select a design project, conduct a market/reimbursement analysis, apply design process methodology, maintain a design history file, and create a prototype product.

 

Prerequisites: Bioengineering Seniors only.

 

Course Objectives: Students will be able to apply appropriate product design-related procedures and tools, maintain design history files, conduct preliminary market/reimbursement studies, and address regulatory affairs in developing a prototype biomedical product or equivalent.

 

Topics Covered:

·       Developing student ability to use of state-of-the-art design tools such as computer aided engineering (SolidWorks 2010-2011), finite element analysis (COSMOS Works), computational fluid mechanics (COSMOS FloWorks), and signal acquisition and processing (LabVIEW);

·       Developing student ability to synthesize and apply engineering and scientific principles to solve real-world problems (i.e., do something);

·       Developing student ability to understand the unique requirements of the medical product design process;

·       Developing student ability to assess/predict product reliability;

·       Developing student ability to construct experimental plans using statistical design of experiments (DOX) methodologies (DesignEase);

·       Developing student ability to effectively communicate in the product design process - both verbally and in writing;

·       Developing student appreciation of key accounting, finance, and marketing principles.

 

Schedule: Class meets once a week for 3 hours.

 

3.23. BIOENG 1161: Bioengineering Design 2

Credits: 3 (Letter Grade Only)

 

Semesters Offered: Spring

 

Description: The two-course sequence, Bioengineering Design 1 & 2, is a mentored opportunity for the student to synthesize and extend skills and knowledge acquired during the undergraduate education experience in design (or redesign) of a biomedical product or equivalent. Students are exposed to key facets of the medical product design process and the unique regulatory requirements for biomedical products. Student teams select a design project, conduct a market/reimbursement analysis, apply design process methodology, maintain a design history file, and create a prototype product.

 

Prerequisites: BIOENG 1160.

 

Course Objectives: Students will be able to apply appropriate product design-related procedures and tools, maintain design history files, conduct preliminary market/reimbursement studies, and address regulatory affairs in developing a prototype biomedical product or equivalent.

 

Topics Covered:

·       Developing student ability to use of state-of-the-art design tools such as computer aided engineering (SolidWorks 2010-2011), finite element analysis (COSMOS Works), computational fluid mechanics (COSMOS FloWorks), and signal acquisition and processing (LabVIEW);

·       Developing student ability to synthesize and apply engineering and scientific principles to solve real-world problems (i.e., do something);

·       Developing student ability to understand the unique requirements of the medical product design process;

·       Developing student ability to assess/predict product reliability;

·       Developing student ability to construct experimental plans using statistical design of experiments (DOX) methodologies (DesignEase);

·       Developing student ability to effectively communicate in the product design process - both verbally and in writing;

·       Developing student appreciation of key accounting, finance, and marketing principles.

 

Schedule: Class meets once a week for 3 hours.

 

3.24. BIOENG 1210: Bioengineering Thermodynamics

Credits: 3 (Letter Grade Only)

 

Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring

 

Description: Conservation principles are fundamental and ubiquitous in engineering applications. Biothermodynamics uses an interactive framework to explore the development and use of fundamental methodology in application of conservation principles to describe the flow of mass and energy in biological and physiological processes and, in particular, heat transfer in biomedical applications.

 

Prerequisites: MATH 0290 and PHYS 0175 or PHYS 0476 and CHEM 0960 or CHEM 0120 or CHEM 0720.

 

Course Objectives: Upon successfully completing Biothermodynamics, the student should be able to state and apply fundamental concepts in mass and energy conservation, at both the macroscopic and microscopic scales, and to set up and solve problems related to mass and energy conservation in relevant physiological systems and biomedical applications.

 

Topics Covered:

·       Units/significant figures

·       Conservation of mass (mass and population balances)

·       First Law of Thermodynamics (conservation of energy)

·       Second Law of Thermodynamics (entropy)

·       Free energy and associated thermodynamic relations

·       Isothermal versus adiabatic processes

·       Applications to heat transfer:

o   Macroscopic approaches

o   Microscopic approaches

o   Steady-state versus time dependent problems

 

Schedule: Class meets twice weekly for 75 minutes; recitation once a week for 50 minutes.

 

3.25. BIOENG 1211: Honors Bioengineering Thermodynamics

Credits: 3 (Letter Grade Only)

 

Semesters Offered: Spring

 

Description: Conservation principles are fundamental and ubiquitous in engineering applications. Biothermodynamics uses an interactive framework to explore the development and use of fundamental methodology in application of conservation principles to describe the flow of mass and energy in biological and physiological processes and, in particular, heat transfer in biomedical applications. In addition to the materials covered in BIOENG 1210 (Bioengineering Thermodynamics), BIOENG 1211 includes a weekly seminar in which students are expected to read and discuss current journal publications of interest to Bioengineering Thermodynamics.

 

Prerequisites: MATH 0290 and PHYS 0175 or PHYS 0476 and CHEM 0960 or CHEM 0120 or CHEM 0720 and 3.25 GPA or instructor permission.

 

Course Objectives: Upon successfully completing Biothermodynamics, the student should be able to state and apply fundamental concepts in mass and energy conservation, at both the macroscopic and microscopic scales, and to set up and solve problems related to mass and energy conservation in relevant physiological systems and biomedical applications.

 

Topics Covered:

·       Units/significant figures

·       Conservation of mass (mass and population balances)

·       First Law of Thermodynamics (conservation of energy)

·       Second Law of Thermodynamics (entropy)

·       Free energy and associated thermodynamic relations

·       Isothermal versus adiabatic processes

·       Applications to heat transfer:

o   Macroscopic approaches

o   Microscopic approaches

o   Steady-state versus time dependent problems

 

Schedule: Class meets twice weekly for 75 minutes; recitation once a week for 50 minutes. Seminar meets once a week for 50 minutes.

 

3.26. BIOENG 1218: Emerging Biomedical Technologies (Honors)

Credits: 3 (Letter Grade Only)

 

Semesters Offered: Spring

 

Description: Emerging Biomedical Technologies is offered by Rehabilitation Science and cross-listed with Bioengineering. The purpose of this course is to provide the students with an understanding of stem cell biology, tissue engineering, and related applications involved in rehabilitation sciences and regenerative medicine. The course material is designed to aid students considering a future as researchers in biomedical sciences laboratories or biotechnology research and development. It will provide digests of the latest research technologies and clinical applications in these fields. Students will be encouraged to synthesize concepts aimed to test solutions and therapies to improve human health by use of modern biomedical technologies. The lecture and discussion format give students a broad background and the opportunity to apply critical thinking skills to recent published findings

 

Prerequisites: BIOENG 1210 or instructor permission.

 

Course Objectives: Students who satisfactorily complete the course should be able to:

1.     Describe the emergent life science technologies covered in the course;

2.     Describe the biology of stem cells, their unique characteristics, and uses as therapies for disease and injury;

3.     Describe different approaches used in gene and cell therapeutic strategies;

4.     Describe the complexity of ethical and legal issues involved in this line of biomedical research;

5.     Describe the process of moving research into the translational phase with sufficient knowledge of the processes of FDA approval of therapies;

6.     Demonstrate an ability to effectively search for, analyze and critique current scientific publications on stem cell biology, cell and gene therapy and tissue engineering;

7.     Synthesize concepts aimed to test solutions and therapies to improve human health by use of modern biotechnologies discussed in class.

 

Topics Covered:

·       Introduction to stem cells: differentiation and development, types of stem cells-- Embryonic, Adult derived, and Induced pluripotent stem cells

·       Animal models of injury, transgenic strains, other related material

·       Cell therapy applications: Experimental and clinical applications

·       Gene therapy applications: Experimental and clinical applications

·       Biomaterials involved in tissue engineering and cell-based constructs

·       Nano-biotechnology, drug packaging, delivery and bio-printing/patterning technologies

·       Fluorescent microscopy, cell tracking, and in vivo imaging

·       Health of cells in culture: diagnostics: karyotypes, Fluorescent in situ hybridization, and molecular genetic testing

·       Introduction to microarray technology and applications

·       Biotechnology Industry, FDA regulations, and Patenting

·       Ethical issues associated with use of modern biotechnologies

 

Schedule: Class meets once a week for 2 hours and 50 minutes each time.

 

3.27. BIOENG 1220: Biotransport Phenomena

Description: Biotransport Phenomena follows logically from Biothermodynamics (BIOENG 1210). Thermodynamics principally looks at systems in equilibrium, along with nonequilibrium heat transport and exchange problems. Biotransport Phenomena principally looks at fluid and mixture systems disrupted from equilibrium. The fundamental principles of momentum and species mass transfer are developed and illustrated through applications to practical problems pertaining to physiological and biomedical processes. Students are introduced to the use of conservation balances to describe macroscopic and microscopic properties of a system.

 

Prerequisites: MATH 0240 and BIOENG 1210 or BIOENG 1211 (or equivalent).

 

Course Objectives: Upon completing the course, the student should be able to describe the fundamental principles pertaining to biomedical fluid mechanics and transport phenomena and apply the fundamental principles to set up and solve problems in physiological systems and design of medical devices.

 

Topics Covered:

·       Derivation of integral and differential balances for mass and momentum transport;

·       Geometry considerations (cartesian, cylindrical, spherical) in derivation of differential balances;

·       Macroscopic and microscopic constitutive relations;

·       Selection of boundary conditions;

·       Dimensional analysis;

·       Analytical and numerical solution of transport problems;

·       Interpretation of results.

 

Schedule: Class meets twice weekly for 75 minutes; recitation once a week for 50 minutes.

 

3.28. BIOENG 1241: Societal, Political and Ethical Issues in Biotechnology

Credits: 3 (Letter Grade Only)

 

Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring

 

Description: Engineering, as a profession, has ethical obligations to society that go beyond the simple application of technology as learned in science and technology courses. Bioethics seeks to supplement technological aspects of bioengineering by engaging students in an analysis of the effects of bioengineering developments on society, focusing on safety of the public as a primary ethical concern. Students are educated on a variety of ethical tools that enable them to analyze fictional, yet realistic, cases. Students are evaluated individually, as well as in groups, with a particular focus on the ethical issues developed in a group case project.

 

Prerequisites: Bioengineering Juniors/Seniors and Department permission.

 

Course Objectives: Upon completion of the course, students will be able to recognize, articulate, and resolve ethical issues within the arena of bioengineering.

 

Topics Covered:

·       Safety as a primary ethical concern of bioengineering;

·       Professionalism;

·       Methods of ethical analysis and Codes of Ethics;

·       Truth telling and Academic Honesty;

·       Animal Research;

·       Human Enhancements;

·       Confidentiality;

·       Cost/Risk vs Benefit;

·       Organ Donation.

 

Schedule: Class meets twice weekly for 75 minutes.

 

3.29. BIOENG 1255: Dynamic Systems: A Physiological Perspective

Credits: 4 (Letter Grade Only)

 

Semesters Offered: Fall

 

Description: A foundation of basic systems concepts is built through combining modeling of dynamic systems with physiological examples. Mathematical models of physiological systems are developed using a combination of systems understanding (circuits, analogous thinking, engineering synthesis and analysis, and integrative system approaches in solving problems) and bioengineering design (recognizing the potential applications of both engineering principles to biology and biological principles to engineering). These models are then used to address biological/clinical questions. Upon completing the course, the student should be able to: demonstrate skill and competence in methods of dynamic systems modeling through (a) building dynamic models of bioelectrical, biomechanical, biochemical, and physiological systems, (b) solving systems of equations representing dynamic models including analytical, numerical, and graphical software methods, (c) validating models including descriptive, predictive, and explanative validation, and (d) applying models to scientific and engineering applications including analysis and synthesis relative to identification and simulation. Describe physiological processes in dynamic system terms. Students are expected to be very proficient in electrical circuits since they will apply their knowledge on circuits throughout the entire course.

 

Prerequisites: BIOENG 1320 (or equivalent) and BIOSC 1250 (or equivalent).

 

Course Objectives: Upon completing the course, the student should be able to:

·       Demonstrate skill and competence in methods of dynamic systems modeling through:

o   building dynamic models of bioelectrical, biomechanical, biochemical, and physiological systems;

o   solving systems of equations representing dynamic models including analytical, numerical, and graphical software methods;

o   validating models including descriptive, predictive, and explanative validation; and

o   applying models to scientific and engineering applications including analysis and synthesis relative to identification and simulation;

·       Describe physiological processes in dynamic system terms.

 

Topics Covered:

·       Use of balancing techniques in building models of conserved quantities such as: electrical charge, material, energy, momentum, etc.;

·       Relative roles of theory (physical laws) and empirical observation (constitutive relations) in model construction;

·       Distinctions between deterministic vs. probabilistic systems; linear vs. nonlinear systems; and time-varying vs. time-invariant systems, spatially lumped vs. distributed systems;

·       Contrast the use of modeling in engineering analysis, synthesis, and design vs. its use in scientific analysis, prediction, and explanation;

·       Physiological systems: cardiovascular, body fluid, respiratory, metabolic, neuro-endocrine, bio-electric, and musculoskeletal.

 

Schedule: Class meets twice weekly for 75 minutes; workshop once a week for 2.5 hours.

 

3.30. BIOENG 1310: Linear Systems and Electronics 1 (Bioinstrumentation)

Credits: 3 (Letter Grade Only)

 

Semesters Offered: Spring

 

Description: Bioinstrumentation covers electronic circuit theory and the practical aspects of building electronic prototypes. The mathematics of complex exponentials and complex impedance are also covered. A series of projects are built by each student individually, using a system of student-owned electronics components and tools called the PittKit. The kit includes a special apparatus, the Breadboard Laboratory Interface Processor (BLIP) which each student constructs, and which acts as a logging voltmeter, a frequency meter, a logic analyzer, a waveform generator, and a pulse duration meter. The Micro-BLIP, based on the popular Arduino “Micro” microcontroller, interfaces to any computer via a USB port, without requiring any special software to be installed on the computer. Students may reprogram the microcontroller for projects after the course.

 

Prerequisites: MATH 0240 and PHYS 0175 (or equivalent).

 

Course Objectives: After completing the course, the student should be able to design and construct prototypes of useful, simple circuits, such as preamplifiers and signal conditioners for sensors, as well as use off-the-shelf modules to construct laboratory instrumentation. Additionally, the student should be able to describe applications to other linear systems such as those found in physiological systems with greater clarity from having worked with circuits.

 

Topics Covered:

·       DC circuit theory;

·       AC circuit theory;

·       Sensors;

·       Digital logic;

·       Basic computer architecture;

·       Basic high frequency theory;

·       Power sources.

 

Schedule: Class meets twice weekly for 75 minutes; laboratory once a week for 2.5 hours.

 

3.31. BIOENG 1320: Biological Signals & Systems

Credits: 3 (Letter Grade Only)

 

Semesters Offered: Fall

 

Description: The theory and application of linear time-invariant (LTI) systems is explored, with emphasis on an appreciation of the description and analysis of biomedical signals and systems via LTI methods.

 

Prerequisites: BIOENG 1310 (or equivalent) and MATH 0240 and MATH 0290.

 

Course Objectives: After completing the course, the student should be able to state the properties of LTI systems; be able to test whether a system is LTI; know how to obtain, and interpret, the frequency response, impulse response, step response, and transfer function of a system. The student should also be able to demonstrate mastery of the mathematical skills of convolution and integral transform techniques.

 

 

 

Topics Covered:

·       Linear, time-invariant (LTI) systems: definition; input-output relations (convolution); impulse response; step response; stability; causality; differential equation description;

·       Frequency (Fourier) analysis: response of LTI systems to sinusoids; Fourier transform, Fourier series; frequency response of LTI systems;

·       Systems and Transforms: Fourier, Laplace; transfer function; Closed-loop (feedback) control systems; stability; causality; inverse system; LTI filters: low-pass, high-pass, band-pass, pole-zero plots and relation to time and frequency domain responses;

·       Discrete-time signals and systems: Sampling and aliasing; difference equations; Z-transform.

 

Schedule: Class meets twice weekly for 75 minutes; recitation once a week for 50 minutes.

 

3.32. BIOENG 1330: Biomedical Imaging

Credits: 3 (Letter Grade Only)

 

Semesters Offered: Fall

 

Description: Biomedical Imaging introduces the major imaging modalities (x-ray, CAT-scan, MRI, ultrasound) used in clinical medicine and biomedical research, as well as the fundamentals of images, from a signals and systems standpoint.

 

Prerequisites: BIOENG 1320 (or equivalent).

 

Course Objectives: After completing the course, the student should be able to use imaging modalities to determine anatomical or physiological function and apply physics and signal processing in medical imaging for particular research applications.

 

Topics Covered:

·       Signal processing background for imaging

·       X-Ray and Computed Tomography (CT)

·       Nuclear Medicine

·       Ultrasound

·       Magnetic Resonance Tomography

·       Image Analysis and Visualization

 

Schedule: Class meets twice weekly for 75 minutes.

 

3.33. BIOENG 1340: Introduction to Medical Imaging and Image Analysis

Credits: 3 (Letter Grade Only)

 

Semesters Offered: Fall

 

Description: Introduction to Medical Imaging and Image Analysis presents the physics of image formation as well as methods for tomographic image reconstruction for major medical imaging modalities, including X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Also introduced are fundamentals of digital image processing, with particular emphasis on medical applications, including basic techniques to enhance image quality, image de-noising, methods for extracting, classifying, and tracking features of and objects in images, etc. Students will learn how to implement these techniques in MATLAB (The MathWorks Inc., Natick, MA) to solve practical image processing problems. MATLAB exercises will demonstrate to students how filtering operations applied in the image domain or the Fourier domain affect medical images. In addition to these fundamentals, more advanced algorithmic approaches for image segmentation and image as well as point-cloud registration techniques will also be reviewed.

 

Prerequisites: BIOENG 1320 (or equivalent) and MATH 0240 and MATH 0290 (or equivalent).

 

Course Objectives: Upon course completion, students will have a strong fundamental understanding of the physics behind tomographic imaging devices for medical imaging. More specifically, students will be able describe the physics of image formation, build linear systems models of imaging devices and further programmatically simulate image formation of specific imaging modalities relevant to biomedical imaging.

 

This course is grounded firmly on mathematical modeling of imaging systems and will therefore offer students a keen intuition in regard to designing effective image processing pipelines for visualization and analysis of acquired images from a range of 1D, 2D, 3D and 4D (i.e. 3D + time) biological and medical imaging modalities.

 

Topics Covered:

·       Principles of imaging from major modalities

·       Image visualization and rendering

·       Fundamental image filtering in the time domain and frequency domain

·       Basic medical and biological image processing

·       Applications of medical image processing

·       Statistical data analysis

·       Machine learning for biomarker-based classification

 

Schedule: Class meets once per week for 150 minutes.

 

3.34. BIOENG 1351: Computer Applications in Bioengineering

Credits: 3 (Letter Grade Only)

 

Semesters Offered: Fall

 

Description: LabVIEW programming is taught in the context of real-world tasks that engineering students will likely encounter in future academic or industrial work. Practical applications of signal processing tools and software design specification development are especially relevant. The fundamentals of LabVIEW, data flow programming concepts, programming with graphical user interfaces, modular programming structures, and data acquisition and control concepts are covered.

 

Prerequisites: ENGR 0012 or CS 0441.

 

Course Objectives: Upon completing the course, students should be able to successfully implement a solution to basic engineering programming tasks using LabVIEW. Students should be able to identify and utilize open source and commercial software libraries to tackle more advanced design problems without coding from scratch. Students should be able to effectively use LabVIEW to solve real-world engineering computing problems.

 

Topics Covered:

·       Creating a LabVIEW project;

·       LabVIEW syntax, graphical programming design;

·       Data acquisition theory and hardware considerations;

·       GUI programming;

·       Project management and software design specification concepts;

·       Graphical code documentation and hierarchical structure;

·       Add on toolkits such as LINX (for Arduino communication) and Open G (general open source tools).

 

Schedule: Class meets twice weekly for 75 minutes.

 

3.35. BIOENG 1355: Medical Product Regulation and Reimbursement

Credits: 3 (Letter Grade Only)

 

Semesters Offered: Spring

 

Description: This course has been created as an introduction to the medical product development requirements of the Food and Drug Agency (FDA). Also included is an overview of medical product reimbursement of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS).

 

Prerequisites: No requirements for Bioengineering students. Non-BioE students require instructor permission.

 

Course Objectives: Upon completing the course, the student should be familiarized with: (a) how the history of the FDA affects the Agency’s perspectives and regulatory activities; (b) an introduction to quality systems with a focus on FDA's Quality System Regulation (QSR); (c) an overview of the key elements of the Design Controls subsection of the FDA QSR; (d) how the regulatory requirements in Europe contrast with those of the FDA; (e) how FDA regulatory requirements differ from reimbursement policies of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS).

 

Topics Covered:

·       History and mission of the U.S. Food and Drug Agency (FDA)

·       Medical product reimbursement in the U.S.

·       FDA pre-market requirements

·       Special, abbreviated, and de novo 510(k)’s as well as humanitarian device exemption (HDE)

·       Introduction to quality systems (e.g., ISO 9001, JCAHO, and FDA QSR)

·       Relationship between FDA's Quality System Regulation (QSR; 21 CFR 820) and ISO 9001

·       FDA QSR - Design Controls 21 CFR 820.30

·       FDA Guidance documents and Standards (ISO 13485 and ISO 14971)

·       Design Input and hazard and risk analysis (21 CFR 820.30(g))

·       Design Output – Verification and Validation (21 CFR 820.30(f) 21 CFR 820.30(g))

·       Design documentation, changes, and document control – (21 CFR 820.30(i))

·       Post-market requirements (labeling, advertising, post-marketing surveillance)

·       Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS)

·       Regulation and reimbursement in the E.U.

 

Schedule: Class meets twice weekly for 75 minutes.

 

3.36. BIOENG 1370: Computational Simulation in Medical Device Design

Credits: 3 (Letter Grade Only)

 

Semesters Offered: Fall

 

Description: Computational simulation is becoming an increasingly utilized method to assess the performance of medical devices. This course provides students with a hands-on learning experience on how to use computational simulation in the modeling and design of medical devices. The course details the important steps in simulations from preprocessing to solution to post-processing and data presentation. Commercially available software programs will be introduced and used to simulate a variety of physical phenomena (solid, fluid, transport) pertinent to medical device design.

 

Prerequisites: BIOENG 1630.

 

Course Objectives: Upon completing the course, the student should be able to simulate the solid, fluid, and transport phenomena that are useful in medical device design. Particular attention will be placed on avoiding common mistakes in the preprocessing and interpretation of computational results.

 

Topics Covered:

·       Geometry creation;

·       Discretization;

·       Appropriate assignment of material properties;

·       Solver management;

·       Error mitigation and debugging;

·       Postprocessing and data presentation;

·       Data interpretation;

·       Introduction to design optimization.

 

Schedule: Class meets twice weekly for 75 minutes.

 

 

3.37. BIOENG 1383: Biomedical Optical Microscopy

Credits: 3 (Letter Grade Only)

 

Semesters Offered: Spring

 

Description: Optical imaging microscopy techniques have become essential tools to investigate biological processes and diagnose diseases at unprecedented cellular and molecular levels. Biomedical researchers have an increasingly important need both to understand the advantages and limitations of the various types of optical microscopy and to apply the appropriate microscopy technique to solve specific biomedical problems. Biomedical Optical Microscopy is a comprehensive exploration of the basic principles of optical microscopy and imaging techniques commonly used in biomedical research.

 

Prerequisites: One of PHYS 0102, PHYS 0175, PHYS 0106, PHYS 0476, PHYS 0111, PHYS 1306, or PHYS 1361, or BIOENG 1075.

 

Course Objectives: Upon completion of the course, the student should be able to describe the basic principles of common optical imaging microscopy techniques, able to apply an optical microscopy technique to address biological questions, and able to perform basic quantitative image analysis.

 

Topics Covered:

·       Physical basis of light and image formation;

·       Principles and applications of basic optical microscopy techniques (bright-field, dark-field, phase contrast, interference, fluorescence microscopy);

·       Principles and applications of advanced optical microscopy techniques (confocal, deconvolution, two-photon, second-harmonic generation, optical coherence tomography, etc.);

·       Basic concepts in quantitative image analysis.

 

Schedule: Class meets twice a week for 75 minutes each day.

 

3.38. BIOENG 1533: Controlled Drug Delivery

Credits: 3 (Letter Grade Only)

 

Semesters Offered: Spring

 

Description: Controlled Drug Delivery explores the physics, chemistry, and material science rationale behind the engineering of controlled drug delivery systems, which stands as a 114-billion-dollar industry. To this end, the course focuses on topics at the interface between chemical engineering and medicine, such as polymer chemistry, biomaterials, pharmacokinetics, and transport phenomena. Pertinent pharmaceutical examples that are discussed include: transdermal, aerosol, oral, gene, and targeted cellular delivery, with emphasis placed on fabrication considerations and the relevant physiological environment.

 

Prerequisites: BIOENG 1220 (or equivalent) and BIOSC 1000 (or equivalent).

 

Course Objectives: Upon completing the course, the student should be able to state the constraints on material properties posed by the physiological environment; use the fundamentals of polymers, diffusion, degradation, modeling and pharmacokinetics to solve problems specific to controlled drug delivery; and demonstrate ability to search and summarize primary research literature, write a review article, and deliver a cohesive oral presentation.

 

Topics Covered:

·       Polymer basics;

·       Drug delivery systems (reservoir, matrix, bio-erodible systems);

·       Pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of drug delivery systems;

·       Drug elimination and fate;

·       Externally controlled systems;

·       Micro- and Nano-particle based delivery;

·       Cell and gene delivery;

·       Delivery of vaccines (oral, pulmonary, transdermal);

·       Relevant FDA regulations.

 

Schedule: Class meets twice a week for 75 minutes each day.

 

3.39. BIOENG 1580: Biomedical Applications of Signal Processing

Credits: 4 (Letter Grade Only)

 

Semesters Offered: Spring

 

Description: The fundamentals of digital signal processing of time series are developed, via applied exercises and projects with a focus on medical and biological signal analysis and interpretation. Biomedical applications are selected from a variety of areas, such as cardiovascular, gait and balance, electrophysiological (EEG, EKG, ECoG, etc.) and neural signal processing, among others.

 

Prerequisites: BIOENG 1320 (or equivalent).

 

Course Objectives: Upon completion of this course, students should be able to properly acquire data in digital form; perform standard methods of spectral analysis; implement and apply linear time-invariant discrete-time filters; and demonstrate basic skills in digital signal processing.

 

Topics Covered:

·       Review of LTI systems theory;

·       Continuous-time to discrete-time: Sampling, Nyquist theorem, anti-aliasing filters; s-domain to z-domain mapping;

·       Noise removal and digital filtering: FIR and IIR filters; median filtering;

·       Closed-loop (feedback) control systems;

·       Signal detection: stochastic vs. deterministic signals; correlation; the matched filter;

·       Spectral analysis: the discrete-time Fourier transform (DTFT) and the discrete Fourier transform (DFT); periodogram; Welch’s method; Thomson’s method; parametric (AR) methods.

 

Schedule: Class meets twice weekly for 75 minutes; workshop once a week for 2.5 hours.

 

3.40. BIOENG 1586: Quantitative Systems Neuroscience (Honors)

Credits: 3 (Letter Grade Only)

 

Semesters Offered: Spring

 

Description: The course examines some of the major scientific results in behavioral neuroscience, and the mathematical and computational principles of brain function they illustrate. Neuroscience topics include sensory transduction, visual processing, motor control, and neural prosthetics. Students learn to apply techniques from signals and systems, statistics, machine learning, information theory, and control theory to neuroscience data sets. Course format consists of lectures and student-led discussions of important publications in neuroscience.

 

Prerequisites: (BIOENG 1071 or BIOENG 1072) and BIOENG 1320 and 3.25 GPA or instructor permission.

 

Course Objectives: Upon completion of this course, the student should be able to:

·       Describe organizing principles of brain function, from biological and theoretical perspectives;

·       Apply statistics, signal processing, and machine learning techniques to the analysis of biological data sets;

·       Design novel experiments, analyses, and data interpretation;

·       Demonstrate critical evaluation scientific and technical literature.

 

Topics Covered:

·       Sensory transduction;

·       How neurons compute;

·       Sensory and motor systems;

·       Neural prosthetic decoding Introduction.

 

Schedule: Schedule: Three hours of scheduled meeting per week. Time is generally divided as two hours for lecture, one hour for student-led discussions of the primary literature in behavioral and computational neuroscience.

 

3.41. BIOENG 1615: Introduction to Neural Engineering

Credits: 3 (Letter Grade Only)

 

Semesters Offered: Fall

 

Description: This is an introductory neural engineering course for graduate and upper level undergraduate students interested in implantable neural interface technologies. The course covers the basic neuroscience principles that govern engineering of neural interfaces and provides a comprehensive overview of the bioengineering approaches used in neural engineering research.

 

Prerequisites: Upper level undergraduate students.

 

Course Objectives: After completing the course, the students should become familiar with the sources and features of neural signals as well as basic cortical electrode technologies. Students will be able to build fundamental tools for neural electrophysiology signal processing, basic imaging and histology data quantification. Students will be provided with raw neural recording and histology datasets, and will learn to assemble MATLAB-based tools for basic signal processing and analysis.

 

Topics Covered:

·       Molecular biophysics and cellular neuroscience: Neurons; Cortical organization; Neurophysiology; Basic neural circuits; Sources of brain signals;

·       Basic neural computation: Neural spike data processing; Neural oscillations;

·       Combining electrical and imaging technologies: Chronic Electrodes; Two-photon imaging; Calcium reporters; Optogenetics; Intrinsic optical imaging; functional MRI;

·       Non-neuronal cells and immune system in the brain: Blood-brain barrier; Neuroglia;

·       Immunohistochemistry and image quantification: Tissue Labeling; Cell counting; Evaluating cell migration and local neurogenesis;

·       Neural Interface Design: Electrical characterization; Electrical stimulation; Electrode electrochemistry; Stimulation safety; Circuit modeling.

 

Schedule: Class meets twice weekly for 75 minutes.

 

 

3.42. BIOENG 1620: Introduction to Tissue Engineering

Credits: 3 (Letter Grade Only)

 

Semesters Offered: Spring

 

Description: Tissue engineering (TE) is defined as the development and manipulation of laboratory-grown molecules, cells, tissues, or organs to replace and/or support the function of injured body parts. TE is highly interdisciplinary and therefore crosses numerous engineering and medical specialties. The course introduces students to the fundamentals of TE and the biomaterials, cells and growth factors used in TE through consideration of cell and tissue biology, biomaterials, drug delivery, engineering methods and design, and clinical implementation. Specific applications include skin, nerve, bone, and soft tissue regeneration. Throughout the course ties are made between the topic of study and clinically relevant situations.

 

Prerequisites: BIOENG 1810 (or equivalent).

 

Course Objectives: Upon completion of this course, students should be able to:

·       Describe basic principles behind human cell and tissue biology and cell;

·       Describe the general types of biomaterials used in tissue engineering;

·       Describe techniques utilized to design, fabricate, and functionally assess tissue engineering systems; and

·       Apply the combined knowledge of tissue organization and tissue engineering strategies to design a unique, reasonable tissue engineering solution.

 

Topics Covered:

·       Tissue engineering;

·       Biomaterials;

·       Stem cells;

·       Drug delivery.

 

Schedule: Class meets twice a week for 75 minutes each day.

 

3.43. BIOENG 1630: Biomechanics 1 – Mechanical Principles Applied to Biological Systems

Credits: 3 (Letter Grade Only)

 

Semesters Offered: Spring

 

Description: Biomechanics 1 is a first course in undergraduate biomechanics that applies and builds on the concepts of statics, dynamics, and mechanics of materials as applied to human activities and tissues. After briefly reviewing equilibrium concepts and free body diagrams as applied to the human body, principles from kinetics are used to develop dynamic descriptions of human motion. Finally, engineering concepts employed in description of the fundamental strength of materials are applied to biological tissues.

 

Prerequisites: ENGR 0135.

 

Course Objectives: After completion of the course, students should be able to describe the general characteristics and material properties for tissue and organs studied in the course, analyze the forces at a skeletal joint for various static and dynamic human activities, state and use the concepts of balance and stability in describing human motion, and compute the stresses and strains in biological tissues, given loading conditions and material properties.

 

Topics Covered:

·       Analysis of forces in static biological systems;

·       Concept of balance and stability;

·       Linear and angular dynamics of human movement;

·       Application of stress and strain analysis to biological tissues.

 

Schedule: Class meets twice a week for 75 minutes each day. Recitation meets once a week for 50 minutes.

 

3.44. BIOENG 1631: Biomechanics 2 – Introduction to Biodynamics and Biosolid Mechanics

Credits: 3 (Letter Grade Only)

 

Semesters Offered: Fall

 

Description: Modern biomechanics is an increasingly diverse field that encompasses the mechanics of the whole body, all the way down to the cellular and molecular levels. Students are introduced to fundamental concepts and techniques of biodynamics and biosolid mechanics which provide the basis for Biomechanics 3 and 4. General approaches used in mechanics are introduced throughout the semester and applied in several laboratories.

 

Prerequisites: BIOENG 1630 (or equivalent).

 

Course Objectives: Upon completing the course, the student should be able to (1) Demonstrate recall of functional anatomy of musculoskeletal system; (2) Perform inverse dynamic analyses; (3) Describe the principles of basic muscle biomechanics; (4) Perform analyses of deformable bodies (including viscoelastic materials); and (5) Describe general experimental techniques for rigid and deformable body analyses.

 

Topics Covered:

·       Inverse dynamic analyses and anthropometry;

·       Overview of lower extremity – musculoskeletal anatomy;

·       Functional models of skeletal muscle;

·       Constitutive relations, extension, compression, torsion, bending, inflation, and viscoelasticity of deformable tissues.

 

Schedule: Class meets twice weekly for 75 minutes.

 

3.45. BIOENG 1632: Biomechanics 3 – Biodynamics of Movement

Credits: 3 (Letter Grade Only)

 

Semesters Offered: Spring

 

Description: Biodynamics, the area of focus in Biomechanics 3, is the study of large-scale movements in biologic systems. As such, the course focuses on the analysis of human movement, which is used in clinical and research settings to understand how various pathologies impact movement and how interventions can be implemented to aid those affected by movement disorders. We cover the fundamentals of biomechanics of human movement using mechanical modeling techniques. The major focus is kinematic analyses in three dimensions using matrix techniques. Some fundamentals of kinetics are covered as well, 2D and 3D inverse dynamics.

 

Prerequisites: BIOENG 1631 and MATH 0280 (or equivalent).

 

Course Objectives: Upon completing the course, the student should be able to describe basic methods of kinematic/kinetic analysis used in multi-link systems and be able to implement the methods in the analysis of human movement. Students should also be able to apply the methods to study common human movements, e.g. gait analyses, eye movement analyses, etc. Finally, students should be able to use the computer programming language, MATLAB, to perform computations on kinematic data.

 

Topics Covered:

·       Coordinate systems;

·       Matrix methods of translation and rotations;

·       MATLAB methods of analysis;

·       Euler angles;

·       Eye movement analyses, gait analyses;

·       Joint configurations;

·       Kinematic chain systems;

·       Anthropometrics;

·       2D- and 3D- inverse dynamics;

·       Motion capture equipment;

·       Introduction to OPENSIM (musculoskeletal modeling and simulation software package);

·       Overview of concepts needed to understand filtering of movement data.

 

Schedule: Class meets twice a week for 75 minutes each day. Laboratories are included using instrumentation in the Human Movement and Balance Laboratory.

 

3.46. BIOENG 1633: Biomechanics 4 – Biomechanics of Organs, Tissues and Cells

Credits: 3 (Letter Grade Only)

 

Semesters Offered: Fall

 

Description: Modern biomechanics is an increasingly diverse field that encompasses the mechanics of the whole human body, including all the way down to the cellular and molecular levels. Biomechanics 4 builds upon biomechanics fundamentals learned in BIOENG 1630 and 1631 in building a comprehensive application of biosolid mechanics to describe the mechanical behavior of soft and hard biological tissues. The course provides fundamental concepts in the development and application of constitutive models, as well as a foundation for more advanced topics that are covered in graduate school. Mathematicaä (Wolfram Research, Inc.) is used both in class and for assignments.

 

Prerequisites: BIOENG 1631 and MATH 0280 (or equivalent).

 

Course Objectives: Upon completing the course, the student should be able to formulate biomechanics constitutive models that describe soft and hard tissues and use Mathematicaä as a framework for exploring the impact of model parameters in the model description.

 

Topics Covered:

·       Intro to indicial notation;

·       Theromelasticity;

·       General linear elasticity and material symmetry;

·       3-D stress and strain states;

·       Applied nonlinear optimization;

·       Viscoelasticity;

·       Stress-strain relations for finite deformations;

·       Usage of the software package Mathematicaä (Wolfram Research, Inc.).

 

Schedule: Class meets twice weekly for 75 minutes.

 

3.47. BIOENG 1680: Biomedical Applications of Control

Credits: 4 (Letter Grade Only)

 

Semesters Offered: Spring

 

Description: The effect of feedback control on analysis and design is explored, with an emphasis on biological and physiological systems.

 

Prerequisites: BIOENG 1320 (or equivalent).

 

Course Objectives: Upon completing this course, students should be able to:

·       Construct mathematical models of physiological systems;

·       Analyze temporal dynamics of a physiological system using linear systems concepts;

·       Characterize the effects of feedback and controller on system performance;

·       Design linear controllers to meet desired system specifications.

 

Topics Covered:

·       Modeling of physiological systems:

o   Balanced equations;

o   Block diagrams;

o   Transfer functions;

·       Specifications of feedback systems:

o   Dynamic response;

o   Pole/zero analysis;

o   Stability analysis;

o   PID control;

·       Design of feedback controllers:

o   Root-locus method;

o   Compensation;

·       Stability of feedback systems:

o   Frequency response and Bode plots;

o   Nyquist stability and Nyquist plots;

o   Time delays;

·       State-space representation.

 

Schedule: Class meets twice weekly for 75 minutes; workshop once a week for 2.5 hours.

 

3.48. BIOENG 1810: Biomaterials and Biocompatibility

Credits: 3 (Letter Grade Only)

 

Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring

 

Description: Undergraduate students are introduced to an advanced understanding of biomaterials and the use of biomaterial in areas such as artificial organs, implantable devices and tissue engineering. Throughout the course, ties are made between the topic of study and clinically relevant biomaterial performance. The course introduces various biomaterials, such as polymers, metals, and ceramics, with the focus on biomaterial synthesis, characterization, structure-property relationship and surface modification. Biocompatibility issues of biomaterials will be discussed from different aspects such as protein adsorption, foreign body reaction, immune and inflammatory response, and sterilization. Finally, examples of clinical applications are discussed.

 

Prerequisites: CHEM 0320 and (BIOSC 1000 or BIOSC 1810 or CHEM 1810 or CHE 1530).

 

Course Objectives: Upon completing the course, the student should be able to:

1.     state the basic principles behind human tissue response to artificial surface implantation;

2.     describe the general types of materials used in soft and hard tissue replacements, drug delivery devices, and extracorporeal devices;

3.     describe techniques utilized to control the physiologic response to artificial surfaces; and

4.     identify various design strategies and clinical applications of biomaterials.

 

Topics Covered:

·       Material science of (polymer, metals, ceramics, glasses, and nature derived materials);

·       Surface modification and immobilization;

·       Protein adsorption and cell adhesion;

·       Immune response, inflammatory response and foreign body reaction;

·       Infection and sterilization;

·       In vitro and in vivo evaluation;

·       Clinical applications (cardiovascular, neurological, drug delivery etc.).

 

Schedule: Class meets twice a week for 75 minutes each day.

 

3.49. ENGR Courses Administered by Bioengineering

3.47.1. ENGR 0501: Music Engineering (Honors)

Credits: 1 (Letter Grade Only)

 

Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring

 

Description: An honors course directed toward development of basic skills in recording engineering through expanded understanding of the science and engineering of music. The course will use the Music Engineering Laboratory (MEL) located in Benedum Hall. The MEL is a state of the art sound recording facility with research and educational capabilities for sound recording and music engineering. Students are expected to have a strong interest in recording and must have prior musical experience.

 

Prerequisites: Instructor permission required.

 

Course Objectives: Students will learn and demonstrate practical experience in recording and knowledge of operating the studio.

 

Topics Covered:

·       Recording engineering (microphones, amplifiers, mixing, filtering, special effects).

 

Schedule: Class meets once a week for 60 minutes, attendance required. Additionally, students will schedule time in the MEL for individual projects.

 

3.47.2. ENGR 1770: Engineering Foundations of Music (Honors)

Credits: 3 (Letter Grade Only)

 

Semesters Offered: Fall

 

Description: Since Paleolithic times, engineering has been applied to the production of music, but advances in the past few centuries, including sound recording, the introductions of electronics, and a greater understanding of the physics, mathematics, and psychology of sound, have greatly expanded what a student can learn in the field of Music Engineering. This is a lecture course about the engineering aspects of music, including the following general topics: the physics of sound and the mathematics of harmony; the means of creation through mechanical musical instruments, including the human voice, as well as electronic instruments; recording, reproduction, and enhancement though signal processing; interaction with human perceptual, cognitive, and motor systems. Assuming knowledge of differential and integral calculus, the course will develop (or review) a basic understanding of convolution and Fourier analysis through examples in the engineering aspects of music. Starting with an historical perspective on technology, we will extrapolate a look into the future of Music Engineering.

 

Prerequisites: MATH 0220 and MATH 0230 (or equivalent). Instructor permission required.

 

Course Objectives: Upon completing the course, students will be able to describe engineering aspects of musical instruments, reproduction, and processing and apply the mathematical and physical basis for sound and the theory of harmony in understanding the system of interaction between human and machine that constitutes music.

 

Topics Covered:

·       Convolution and Fourier analysis;

·       Physics of sound;

·       Mathematics of harmony;

·       Physics of mechanical instruments;

·       Recording and reproduction of music;

·       Electronic processing of sound;

·       Electronic synthesis of music;

·       Psychophysics of music.

 

Schedule: Class meets twice weekly for 75 minutes.

 

4. Minors and Certificates

 

A minor and/or certificate on a student’s transcript and resume distinguishes the student as someone who has gone beyond the minimum requirements to get their degree. The minor (certificate) identifies additional skills, knowledge, and abilities that students have acquired. Obtaining a minor or certificate generally requires completing a focused series of five to seven courses. With proper planning, one or more courses can be used to satisfy both major and minor or certificate requirements. Early planning can maximize the educational experience.

Requirements for minors and certificates vary by department and program.

Disclaimer:
While we attempt to keep the information presented here current, departments can change minor requirements without our knowledge. Resolution of any conflict or discrepancy that exists between what is described in this document and the page/document for the department offering the minor defaults to the department offering the minor.

 

Note: Many courses require prerequisites, e.g., MEMS 1028 has a prerequisite of ENGR 0145. The prerequisite requirement means that students need the listed course or its equivalent to do well in the course. BIOENG 1630 is the Bioengineering equivalent of ENGR 0145 and, thus, Bioengineering students do not need to take ENGR 0145 (and cannot use ENGR 0145 as an advanced engineering/science/technical course). Always check with the department offering the minor to see whether stated prerequisites are needed or whether equivalent course(s) that have or will be completed can be used.

 

Note about declaring minor(s): The Swanson School of Engineering (SSoE) Administration Office recommends completing the graduation application form during the semester prior to graduation. For example, if graduating in Spring semester, then it is recommended that the form be completed during Fall semester (specifically, after registering for Spring classes). Minor(s) can then be declared on the graduation application form. Please note that if a minor outside of SSoE is being intended for, e.g. a minor in Computer Science, then it is highly recommended that students communicate, as soon as possible, with the administrative office for the school offering the minor in order to register the minor there. This way, it is guaranteed that students will have a seat in the courses required to obtain the minor.

 

4.1. Minor in Bioengineering

Undergraduates in other departments can obtain a Minor in Bioengineering by satisfactorily completing (grade of C or better) one BioE seminar and five courses for a total of 16 credits. Students interested in a Bioengineering Minor are required to submit a completed BioE Minor Checklist (found under Undergraduate Bioengineering Forms) to the Bioengineering Undergraduate Administrator for course approvals prior to enrolling in BIOENG courses in order to ensure that the requirements for the minor are fulfilled. Approval to use substitute courses to meet minor requirements must be obtained in advance from the Bioengineering Undergraduate Coordinator.


Bioengineering Minor Requirements

·      Bioengineering seminar

o   BIOENG 1086 (0 credits): Bioengineering Seminar for Minors – Attend a minimum of 6 seminar presentations

·      Basic Life Science course
Acceptable course options include (others may be used with permission)

o   BIOENG 1070 (3 credits): Introductory Cell Biology 1

o   BIOENG 1071 (3 credits): Introductory Cell Biology 2

o   BIOSC 0150 (3 credits): Foundations of Biology 1

o   BIOSC 0160 (3 credits): Foundations of Biology 2

o   BIOSC 1000 (3 credits): Principles of Biochemistry, or

§  BIOSC 1810 (3 credits): Macromolecular Structure and Function, or

§  CHE 1530 (3 credits): Biochemistry for Engineers, or

§  CHEM 1810 (3 credits): Chemical Biology

o   BIOSC 1250 (3 credits): Introduction to Human Physiology

o   HRS 1020 (4 credits): Anatomy and Physiology

o   HRS 1023 (4 credits): Human Physiology

·      Course in statistics

o   ENGR 0020 (4 credits): Probability and Statistics for Engineers 1 (SSoE students) or

o   STAT 1000 (4 credits): Applied Statistical Methods (Non-SSoE students)

·      Three BIOENG elective courses (9 credits total)
See Undergraduate Bioengineering Course Descriptions section for the list of undergraduate BIOENG courses.
Note: Students must meet prerequisites (or equivalent) to enroll in BIOENG courses.

 

Note: BIOENG 1070 and BIOENG 1071 are considered Basic Life Science Courses. Neither can be used to satisfy a BIOENG elective course requirement.


Note: BIOENG 1241 (3 credits): Societal, Political and Ethical Issues in Biotechnology is a humanities/social science course that is restricted to Department of Bioengineering students only. The course cannot be used to satisfy a BIOENG elective course requirement.


Note: BIOENG 1095: Special Projects cannot be used to satisfy a BIOENG elective course requirement.

 

4.2. Minor in Chemical Engineering

Bioengineering majors can earn a Minor in Chemical Engineering by taking:

·       CHE 0100 (6 credits): Foundations of Chemical Engineering and CHE 0101 (1 credit): Foundations of Chemical Engineering Laboratory

·       CHE 0400 (5 credits): Reactive Process Engineering and CHE 0401 (1 credit): Reactive Process Engineering Laboratory.

 

Please note that neither course satisfies an elective in any Bioengineering Track. Both can, however, be used to satisfy the Bioengineering 2-course, 6-credit advanced engineering/science/technical elective requirement.

 

4.3. Minor in Computer Science

Requirements for a Minor in Computer Science are:

·       CS 0401 (4 credits): Intermediate Programming Using Java (cross-listed with COE 0401)

·       CS 0445 (3 credits): Data Structures (cross-listed with COE 0445)

·       CS 1501 (3 credits): Algorithm Implementation (cross-listed with COE 1501)

·       Any two of the three courses:

o   CS 0441 (3 credits): Discrete Structures for Computer Science

o   CS 0447 (3 credits): Computer Organization and Assembly Language (cross-listed with COE 0447)

o   CS 0449 (3 credits): Introduction to Systems Software (cross-listed with COE 0449)

 

Bioengineering students can use two of the courses to satisfy the Bioengineering 2-course, 6-credit advanced engineering/science/technical elective requirement. The other three courses are in addition to Bioengineering major requirements.

 

4.4. Minor in Electrical Engineering

Bioengineering majors can earn a Minor in Electrical Engineering by completing three required courses and three elective courses. Specifically,

·       ECE/COE 0031 (3 credits): Electrical Circuits and Systems 1 (satisfied by BIOENG 1310)

·       ECE/COE 0132 (3 credits): Digital Logic

·       ECE/COE 0257 (3 credits): Analysis and Design of Electronic Circuits

·       Three elective courses selected from any offered in Electrical Engineering.

 

Bioengineering majors need five ECE courses to obtain the minor: two required plus three electives. The two required courses, ECE 0132 and ECE 0257are not track electives for any Bioengineering Track. They can, however, be used to satisfy the Bioengineering 2-course, 6-credit advanced engineering/science/technical elective requirement.

 

Bioimaging and Signals Track students can use three additional ECE courses as track electives only if justified in their CEP as signals-related courses (i.e., drawn from the recommended courses for the Biological Signal Processing focus in the track).

 

Biomechanics, Cellular Engineering, and Medical Product Engineering Track students: none of the ECE courses are track electives. Therefore, the remaining three courses are in addition to Bioengineering major requirements.

 

Note: Bioengineering students may not use credit for ECE 1552 (3 credits): Signals and Systems toward graduation (duplication of BIOENG 1320).


Note: Bioengineering students may not use credit for both ECE 1673 (3 credits): Control Systems and BIOENG 1680 toward graduation (duplication of course content).

 

4.5. Minor in Environmental Engineering

Bioengineering majors can earn a Minor in Environmental Engineering by completing five courses. Specifically,

·       CEE 1412 (3 credits): Introduction to Hydrology

·       CEE 1503 (3 credits): Introduction to Environmental Engineering

·       CEE 1505 (3 credits): Water Treatment and Distribution System Design or

o   CEE 1515 (3 credits): Water Collection and Treatment Plant Design

·       CEE 1513 (3 credits): Environmental Engineering Processes

·       CEE 1514 (3 credits): Environmental Impact Assessment

 

None of the courses can be used for any Bioengineering Track elective. Two can, however, be used to satisfy the Bioengineering 2-course, 6-credit advanced engineering/science/technical elective requirement. The remaining three are in addition to Bioengineering major requirements.

 

4.6. Minor in Industrial Engineering

Bioengineering majors can earn a Minor in Industrial Engineering by completing three required courses and two elective courses. Specifically,

·       Required courses

o   ENGR 0020 (4 credits): Probability and Statistics for Engineers 1

o   IE 1054 (3 credits): Productivity Analysis

o   IE 1081 (3 credits): Operations Research

·       Elective courses (any 2 of the following)

o   IE 1035 (3 credits): Engineering Management

o   IE 1040 (3 credits): Engineering Economic Analysis

o   IE 1051 (3 credits): Engineering Product Design

o   IE 1052 (3 credits): Manufacturing Processes and Analysis

o   IE 1055 (3 credits): Facility Layout and Material Handling

o   IE 1061 (3 credits): Human Factors Engineering

o   IE 1080 (3 credits): Supply Chain Analysis

o   IE 1082 (3 credits): Probabilistic Methods in Operations Research

o   IE 1083 (3 credits): Simulation Modeling

 

Note that above requirements are for students that begin their coursework Fall 2019 and beyond. Prior to Fall 2019, students should adhere to:

·       Required courses

o   ENGR 0020 (4 credits): Probability and Statistics for Engineers 1

o   IE 1054 (3 credits): Productivity Analysis

·       Elective courses (any 3 of the following)

o   IE 1035 (3 credits): Engineering Management

o   IE 1040 (3 credits): Engineering Economic Analysis

o   IE 1051 (3 credits): Engineering Product Design

o   IE 1052 (3 credits): Manufacturing Processes and Analysis

o   IE 1061 (3 credits): Human Factors Engineering

o   IE 1080 (3 credits): Supply Chain Analysis

o   IE 1081 (3 credits): Operations Research

o   IE 1083 (3 credits): Simulation Modeling

 

Since Bioengineering majors are required to take statistics (ENGR 0020 – prior to Fall 2018, and BIOENG 1000 – starting Fall 2018), the Industrial Engineering Minor requires 4 additional courses.

 

Bioimaging and Signals and Cellular Engineering Track students can use two of the four courses to satisfy the Bioengineering 2-course, 6-credit advanced engineering/science/technical elective requirement. The other two courses are in addition to Bioengineering major requirements.

 

Biomechanics Track students can use IE 1061 as a track elective. Two courses can be used to satisfy the Bioengineering 2-course, 6-credit advanced engineering/science/technical elective requirement. The fourth course would then be in addition to Bioengineering major requirements.

 

Medical Product Engineering Track

·       Business focus students can use IE 1040, IE 1051, and IE 1080 as track electives; the fourth course can be used to satisfy one of the Bioengineering 2-course, 6-credit advanced engineering/science/technical elective requirement;

·       Technical focus students can use IE 1051 and IE 1061 as a track elective. The two remaining courses can be used to satisfy the Bioengineering 2-course, 6-credit advanced engineering/science/technical elective requirement.

 

4.7. Minor in Material Science Engineering

Bioengineering majors can earn a Minor in Materials Science Engineering by completing five courses. Specifically,

·       ENGR 0022 (3 credits): Materials Structure and Properties

·       MEMS 0040 (3 credits): Materials and Manufacturing

·       MEMS 1053 (3 credits): Structure of Crystals and Diffraction

·       MEMS 1059 (3 credits): Phase Equilibria in Multi-Component Materials

·       MEMS 1063 (3 credits): Phase Transformations and Microstructure Evolution

 

ENGR 0022 is a track elective for Biomechanics and Medical Product Engineering Track (technical focus onlystudents. None of the courses can be used for any other Bioengineering track elective. Two of the courses can be used to satisfy the Bioengineering 2-course, 6-credit advanced engineering/science/technical elective requirement. Any remaining courses are in addition to Bioengineering major requirements.

 

4.8. Minor in Mechanical Engineering

Bioengineering students can earn a Minor in Mechanical Engineering by completing two required courses and three elective courses in one of four focused option areas.

 

Required courses

·       MEMS 0024 (3 credits): Introduction to Mechanical Engineering Design – Medical Product Engineering track elective – satisfied by combination of BIOENG 1024 and BIOENG 0050

·       MEMS 1028 (4 credits): Mechanical Design 1 – Biomechanics and Medical Product Engineering (technical focus only) track elective
Note: BIOENG 1630 satisfies the ENGR 0145 prerequisite for MEMS 1028

 

Elective courses based on focus options

·       Thermal-Fluids Option

o   MEMS 0051 (3 credits): Introduction to Thermo-Fluids Engineering – satisfied by BIOENG 1210

o   MEMS 0071 (3 credits): Introduction to Fluid Dynamics

o   and either

§  MEMS 1051 (3 credits): Applied Thermodynamics or

§  MEMS 1071 (3 credits): Applied Fluid Dynamics

·       Dynamic Systems Option

o   MEMS 1014 (3 credits): Dynamic Systems – satisfied BIOENG 1255

o   MEMS 1015 (3 credits): Rigid-Body Dynamics – Biomechanics track elective
MEMS 1045 (3 credits): Automatic Controls (or ECE controls course)

·       Mechanical Design Option

o   MEMS 1029 (3 credits): Mechanical Design 2 – satisfied by BIOENG 1161

o   MEMS 1033 (3 credits): Fracture Mechanics for Manufacturing and Performance

o   MEMS 1047 (3 credits): Finite Element Analysis – Biomechanics track elective

·       Mechanical Measurements Option

o   MEMS 1014 (3 credits): Dynamic Systems – satisfied by BIOENG 1255

o   MEMS 1041 (3 credits): Mechanical Measurements 1

o   MEMS 1042 (3 credits): Mechanical Measurements 2

 

Depending upon elected track, Bioengineering students have several different possibilities to earn a Mechanical Engineering minor.

 

Bioimaging and Signals Track students: none of the courses in any option can be used as a track elective. Two courses can be used to satisfy the Bioengineering 2-course, 6-credit advanced engineering/science/technical elective requirement. Two, and possibly three, courses are in addition to Bioengineering major requirements.

 

Biomechanics Track students: MEMS 1028 is a track elective.

·       Thermal-Fluids Option
BIOENG 1210 (MEMS 0051) is a required course for Bioengineering majors. Two of MEMS 0024, MEMS 0071, or MEMS 1051 (or MEMS 1071) can be used to satisfy the Bioengineering 2-course, 6-credit advanced engineering/science/technical elective requirement. The third course would be in addition to Bioengineering major requirements.

·       Dynamics Systems Option
BIOENG 1255 (MEMS 1014) is a core selective option for Bioengineering majors. MEMS 1015 is a track elective. MEMS 0024 and MEMS 1045 can be used to satisfy the Bioengineering 2-course, 6-credit advanced engineering/science/technical elective requirement.

·       Mechanical Design Option
BIOENG 1161 (MEMS 1029) is a required course for Bioengineering majors. MEMS 1047 is a track elective. MEMS 0024 and MEMS 1033 can be used to satisfy the Bioengineering 2-course, 6-credit advanced engineering/science/technical elective requirement.

·       Mechanical Measurements Option
BIOENG 1255 (MEMS 1014) is a core selective option for Bioengineering majors. Two of MEMS 0024, MEMS 1041, or MEMS 1042 can be used to satisfy the Bioengineering 2-course, 6-credit advanced engineering/science/technical elective requirement. The third course would be in addition to Bioengineering major requirements.

 

Cellular Engineering Track students: none of the courses in any option can be used as a track elective. Two courses can be used to satisfy the Bioengineering 2-course, 6-credit advanced engineering/science/technical elective requirement. Two, and possibly three, courses are in addition to Bioengineering major requirements.

 

Medical Product Engineering Track students:

·       Business focus: MEMS 0024 is a track elective. None of the courses in any option can be used as a track elective. Two courses can be used to satisfy the Bioengineering 2-course, 6 -credit advanced engineering/science/technical elective requirement. One, and possibly two, courses are in addition to Bioengineering major requirements.

·       Technical focus: MEMS 0024 and MEMS 1028 are track electives.

o   Thermal-Fluids Option
BIOENG 1210 (MEMS 0051) is a required course for Bioengineering majors. MEMS 0071 and MEMS 1051 (or MEMS 1071) can be used to satisfy the Bioengineering 2-course, 6-credit advanced engineering/science/technical elective requirement.

o   Dynamics Systems Option
BIOENG 1255 (MEMS 1014) is a core selective option for Bioengineering majors. MEMS 1015 and MEMS 1045 can be used to satisfy the Bioengineering 2-course, 6-credit advanced engineering/science/technical elective requirement.

o   Mechanical Design Option
BIOENG 1161 (MEMS 1029) is a required course for Bioengineering majors. MEMS 1033 and MEMS 1047 can be used to satisfy the Bioengineering 2-course, 6-credit advanced engineering/science/technical elective requirement.

o   Mechanical Measurements Option
BIOENG 1255 (MEMS 1014) is a core selective option for Bioengineering majors. MEMS 1041 and MEMS 1042 can be used to satisfy the Bioengineering 2-course, 6-credit advanced engineering/science/technical elective requirement.

 

4.9. Minor in Polymer Engineering

The Minor in Polymer Engineering consists of six courses.

 

Core courses

·       CHE 1754 (3 credits): Principles of Polymer Engineering

·       CHEM 1600 (3 credits): Synthesis and Characterization of Polymers and CHEM 1605 (1 credit): Synthesis and Characterization of Polymers Laboratory

 

Required chemistry courses

·       CHEM 0310 (3 credits): Organic Chemistry 1

·       CHEM 0320 (3 credits): Organic Chemistry 2

 

Two research projects with polymer content

·       CHE 1097 (1-12 credits): Special Project

·       CHEM 1710 (1-6 credits): Undergraduate Research

 

CHEM 0310 and CHEM 0320 are track electives for all tracks. With prior approval of the Undergraduate Coordinator in both Bioengineering and Chemical Engineering, BIOENG 1095 can be used to satisfy the CHE 1097 research project requirement as long as a significant polymer content is part of the research project. None of the core or research project courses can be used for any Bioengineering track elective. Two can be used to satisfy the Bioengineering 2-course, 6-credit advanced engineering/science/technical elective requirement. The remaining two are in addition to Bioengineering major requirements.

 

4.10. Minor in Chemistry

Many routes exist to obtain a Minor in Chemistry. The most common route for Bioengineering majors is:

·       Two courses in Freshman Chemistry

o   First course: CHEM 0110 (4 credits): General Chemistry 1, or CHEM 0710 (4 credits): General Chemistry 1 (Honors), or CHEM 0760 (3 credits): General Chemistry for Engineers 1 (Honors), or CHEM 0960 (3 credits): General Chemistry for Engineers 1

o   Second course: CHEM 0120 (4 credits): General Chemistry 2, or CHEM 0720 (4 credits): General Chemistry 2 (Honors), or CHEM 0770 (3 credits): General Chemistry for Engineers 2 (Honors), or CHEM 0970 (3 credits): General Chemistry for Engineers 2

·       CHEM 0310 (3 credits): Organic Chemistry 1

·       CHEM 0320 (3 credits): Organic Chemistry 2

·       CHEM 0345 (2 credits): Organic Laboratory

·       BIOSC 1000 (3 credits): Principles of Biochemistry or BIOSC 1810 (3 credits): Macromolecular Structure and Function

 

Bioengineering majors are required to take Freshman Chemistry.

 

Cellular Engineering Track students are required to take CHEM 0310, CHEM 0320 and BIOSC 1000 (or BIOSC 1810 or CHEM 1810) as part of the track requirements. CHEM 0345 is in addition to Bioengineering major requirements.

 

Bioimaging and Signals, Biomechanics, and Medical Product Engineering Track students can use CHEM 0310 and CHEM 0320 to satisfy two track electives. BIOSC 1000 can be used to satisfy one of the Bioengineering 2-course, 6- credit advanced engineering/science/technical elective requirement. CHEM 0345 is in addition to Bioengineering major requirements.

 

4.11. Minor in Mathematics

Bioengineering majors can earn a Minor in Mathematics by completing at least 15 credits in mathematics courses, with a grade of C or better, as follows:

·       At least 9 credits of courses numbered 0250 or higher

·       At least 6 credits of courses numbered 1000 or higher

·       Students cannot use both MATH 0280 and MATH 1180 nor both MATH 0290 and MATH 1270

 

Since Bioengineering majors are required to take MATH 0280 or MATH 1180 or MATH 1185 and MATH 0290 or MATH 1270, the second requirement (two courses numbered 1000 or higher) can be satisfied with required courses.

Regardless, a Mathematics Minor requires 3 additional courses.

 

Bioimaging and Signals, Cellular Engineering, and Medical Product Engineering Track students can use two of the three math courses to satisfy the Bioengineering 2-course, 6-credit advanced engineering/science/technical elective requirement. The third course would be in addition to Bioengineering major requirements.

 

Biomechanics Track students can use two advanced math courses (MATH 1080 and MATH 1360) to satisfy track requirements. The third course can be used to satisfy one of the Bioengineering 2- course, 6-credit advanced engineering/science/technical elective requirement.

 

Note: The Department of Mathematics offers two courses (MATH 0413 and MATH 1230) with a W designation that can be used to satisfy the W requirement for graduation.

 

4.12. Minor in Neuroscience

Requirements for a Minor in Neuroscience are a minimum of 14 credits distributed as follows:

·       NROSCI 1000 (3 credits): Introduction to Neuroscience or NROSCI 1003 (4 credits): Introduction to Neuroscience (Honors)
Note: Grade of C or better required for both semesters of freshman chemistry and BIOENG 1070/1071.
Note: Grade of C or better required to continue with minor program.

·       Three core courses:

o   NROSCI 1011 (3 credits): Functional Neuroanatomy or NROSCI 1013 (4 credits): Functional Neuroanatomy (Honors)

o   NROSCI 1012 (3 credits): Neurophysiology or NROSCI 1018 (4 credits): Neurophysiology (Honors)

o   NROSCI 1017 (3 credits): Synaptic Transmission or two of the three core courses plus another advanced elective

 

Bioengineering students can accomplish the 14-credit requirement in several ways:

·      Take at least two Honors courses from NROSCI 1003, NROSCI 1013, NROSCI 1018 
Note: Four lecture courses required to achieve at least 14 credits with this option.

·      Take at least one Honors course from NROSCI 1003, NROSCI 1013, NROSCI 1018, two of the three core courses, and an advanced NROSCI elective plus NROSCI 1800. NROSCI 1800 is a 1-credit writing practicum that also satisfies the W requirement.
Note: Four lecture courses plus writing practicum required to achieve 14 credits with this option.

·      Take NROSCI 1000, two of the three core courses, and two advanced NROSCI elective courses
Note: Five lecture courses required – even if one of them is Honors.

 

Bioimaging and Signals Track students can use two of the courses to satisfy track requirements and the other two courses to satisfy the Bioengineering 2-course, 6-credit advanced engineering/science/technical elective requirement.

 

Biomechanics, Cellular Engineering, and Medical Product Engineering Track students can use two courses to satisfy the Bioengineering 2-course, 6-credit advanced engineering/science/technical elective requirement. The other two courses are in addition to Bioengineering major requirements.

 

Note: NROSCI 1800 can be used to satisfy the W requirement but cannot be used as a track or advanced engineering/science/technical elective.


Note: Please note that early planning for a Neuroscience Minor is important because some required prerequisite courses are offered only once a year.

 

4.13. Minor in Physics

Requirements for a Minor in Physics are:

·       PHYS 0174 (4 credits): Basic Physics for Science and Engineering 1 or PHYS 0475: Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering 1 (Honors)

·       PHYS 0175 (4 credits): Basic Physics for Science and Engineering 2 or PHYS 0476: Introductory Physics for Science and Engineering 2 (Honors)

·       PHYS 0219 (2 credits): Basic Laboratory Physics for Science and Engineering

·       PHYS 0477 (4 credits): Introduction to Thermal Physics, Relativity, and Quantum Mechanics

·       One of:

·       PHYS 0481 (3 credits): Principles of Modern Physics 2

·       PHYS 1374 (3 credits): Solid State Physics

·       PHYS 1375 (3 credits): Foundations of Nanoscience

·       PHYS 1376 (3 credits): Introduction to Biological Physics

·       PHYS 1378 (3 credits): Introduction to Nuclear and Particle Physics

 

Since Bioengineering majors are required to take PHYS 0174 and PHYS 0175 (or the Honors equivalents), a Physics Minor requires 3 additional courses. While none of the remaining three counts as a requirement or elective in any track, PHYS 0477, PHYS 0481, PHYS 1374, PHYS 1375, PHYS 1376, and PHYS 1378 can be used to satisfy the Bioengineering 2-course, 6-credit advanced engineering/science/technical elective requirement. PHYS 0219 (a laboratory course) is in addition to Bioengineering major requirements.

 

4.14. International Engineering Studies Certificate

An innovative International Engineering Certificate Program has been created for those students who wish to enhance their degree program with an education abroad experience.

 

Students in the Swanson School of Engineering may earn a certificate in International Engineering Studies (IES) by completing a minimum set of requirements that include an approved, educational international experience and associated cultural enrichment and language studies. The certificate will indicate the country and language in which the IES program was completed.

 

For details please visit the International Engineering Studies Certificate webpage.

 

4.15. Engineering for Humanity Certificate

The Engineering for Humanity Certificate is open to all undergraduate students and both guides and formalizes student participation in engineering projects in which social and/or environmental sustainability is a core thrust.

 

For details please visit the Engineering for Humanity Certificate webpage.

 

4.16. Nuclear Engineering Certificate

The underg